Clutch Slave Cylinder Installation

Accord 04-08 [CN1, CN2] (N22A)

  1. Nighthawk
    Difficulty Level:
     
    Simple
    Hello all,

    So, following my DIY of the master clutch cylinder
    Clutch Master Cylinder Installation • Honda Karma

    I found that, whilst the creaking and clicking had gone from the pedal, there was another creak coming from where the Slave Clutch Cylinder Rod connected with the clutch fork. I took this off, put some copper grease on the end, put her back and rebleed. My mityvac pump could not get a suction on it, kept pulling air bubbles up but I could not figure out why. Anyway, ripped it off again, stripped it down and found what I felt to be a crack and pitting inside of the cylinder which a local garage confirmed. This explained why I could never get a decent bleed out of it (never have been able to) and after a while, the clutch would end up getting spongy. Ordered a new part, this is a quick DIY showing how to remove and reinstall. Not many pics on this one as, to be brutally honest, its pretty damn straight forward.

    My clutch is now just perfect, absolutely perfect. I have never had the clutch in this car feel so nice as it does now that this has been replaced. (Well its pretty much a brand new hydraulic clutch system now with both parts being changed)

    This is how I did it, I don't know if this is the official way, but its done.

    TOOLS:
    - 10mm Flare Wrench
    - 17 mm spanner
    - 10mm and 12mm sockets
    - Long extenstion for socket set
    - Brake cleaner
    - Philips screwdriver (although you can use the 10mm socket if you prefer)
    - No need for rope to tie the kids to a tree for this job, its so quick. Takes longer to bleed the system than to replace it.

    Step 1:
    Disconnect and remove the battery and the battery tray, as well as the intake intercooler hose. Use the phillips screwdriver or 10mm socket to remove the clamp holding this in place. Keep this safe. Just move it out of the way but try not to kink it. I put a plastic bag over the top of this hose and held it there with a cable tie to stop any junk falling into it.

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    Step 2:
    Disconnect the electrical loom. You could probably do this without moving the loom out of the way, but I personally found it easier. It is connected, for the purpose of this job, in three places. The one is on the lower battery support bracket, the second is just above the CSC and the third is just before the alternator on the engine block.

    This is the one on the lower battery support bracket

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    This is the one directly above the slave cylinder

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    The third one was too awkward to get a picture, but it will be obvious when you follow the loom down. They are held on by green clips, pull the tap away from the loom and pull the connector straight back off its bracket. Should come off fairly easily. Move the loom just out of the way to give you some breathing room. There is enough slack.

    Step 3:
    Leave the clutch res cap on to try to prevent as much leakage as possible. Now, just as with the clutch master cylinder, get a 17mm open spanner, hold the quick release in place and break the nipple free with the 10mm flare wrench. This was on harder than the clutch master cylinder but I guess its exposed more to the elements being at the front of the engine.

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    There are two 12mm sockets holding the cylinder in place on the top. You can clearly see them on that last pic. Use your extension set and break them free. They are about an inch long each. Now that you have removed the bleed nipple, there shouldnt be too much pressure pushing the cylinder away from the clutch fork but make sure you are holding the CSC when you take those 12mm bolts out so it doesnt ping away from you and drop brake fluid all over your subframe etc.

    Step 4:
    Grab your new CSC, compare them, I was interested to find out that the part number of my honda part matched the part number of the replacement perfectly - SACHS. Clean the clutch fork to remove any remnants of junk and put some copper grease on the end of the CSC rod. Position the rod into the clutch fork first, and screw it back down with the 12mm bolts. Refit the brake line and tighten fully.

    Step 5:
    Bleed the clutch system. When I got my suspicion about the crack confirmed by a local garage, they offered me some advice which I havent heard before. When you bleed your clutch, when you have the majority of air out of it, keep the nipple open and push back the clutch fork against the CSC rod. This evacuates any trapped air within the CSC and gives a smoother bleed. I used my vacuum pump. It worked flawlessly now, no crack for air to creep into. Bleed the system, then put pressure on the nipple, broke it loose, and pushed back the clutch fork as suggested. Loads more bubbles came out, very handy tip indeed.

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    Step 6:
    Once you have bled it the best you can, check your clutch pedal adjustment again and adjust it if necessary. I needed to adjust mine out a bit more.

    COSTS:
    The total costs for both the master and slave cylinder plus brake fluid came to around £200. She shifts beautifully now, very happy with it. If you have any issues with changing gears, look at these two components.

    Oh, hope these pictures come out ok. Tried taking a picture of the crack and pitting inside the old CSC. The crack is, at a guess, around 7 or 8mm. You can feel it with your finger as a ridge.

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    Anyway, hope this helps someone.
    redefined_cycles and Nels like this.

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  1. Nels
    Nels
    5/5,
    Excellent write up. Thank you for sharing.