Guides 2005 Civic 1.6 (EU8) Clutch Change How To/Guide/Instructions (picture heavy!)

Discussion in '7th Generation (2001-2005)' started by SpeedyGee, Saturday 12th Mar, 2016.

  1. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    I did a clutch change on a 2005 EU8 Civic 1.6 last weekend, thought I'd document the process for all to see.

    I'll start by saying that this is pretty big job, it can be done as a DIY task but you will need lots of clearance under the car.

    Luckily I have some handy ramps that help me out here. These allow me to work safely under the car and give lots of ground clearance. I did this job totally on my own but ideally it should be a two man job. Remember that safety should always be paramount.

    Tools, what tools do you need ? Can I just answer that with "Lots" ? :Grin:

    I don't have a precise list of tools but I have the following to hand (and probably more) :- At least 2 sets of metric spanners, 3/8" Blue Point socket set, 1/2" Draper socket set, 1/2" impact set, a fair few 3/8" and 1/2" extension bars, breaker bars, low range and high range torque wrenches, impact gun, homemade compressor, screw driver set, pliers set, long nose plier set, crowbar. Two hydraulic jacks, two sets of stands, one 6 ton air/hyrdraulic jack. Clutch centering tool

    Anyway here goes, ramps setup :-
    1.
    Excuse the messy garage, it's been awhile since it's had a thorough clean.

    The patient arrives :-
    2.

    Mucky engine bay
    3.

    The car is jacked up and both wheels are removed, We need to get the drive shafts out, normally I'd crack the bottom ball joint so the hub assembly stays connected to the suspension leg and the whole leg pulls back but on these EU8s the bottom ball joint is an absolute pain to crack. So instead, in this case I decided to undo the to big bolts holding hub assembly to the suspension leg. Before you do this actually you need to unbolt the caliper and hang it up safely. Also you need to disconnect the ABS sensor, it has two small 10mm bolts securing it, unbolt these, pull the wire forward and you'll see the connector that can be unplugged. You also need to remove the big hub nut at the end of the drive shaft, that nut has a pinched/indented slot, get a pointed chisel and straighten this indent out. Now remove the nut, it needs a 32mm socket. I have decent air impact gun which makes light work of such bolts. If you don't have one of these, then I recommend removing this with the wheel on and car on the ground, centre wheel cap off and use a breaker bar with a long extension on it. Get someone to firmly push the foot brake, whilst you try and crack the nut. Once cracked you do the same on the other side and get the wheel back off and car jacked up again.
    4.

    End result is this :-
    3a.
    Go under the car with a strong flat screwdriver, wedge the screw driver between the gearbox and the driveshaft and push the top of the screwdriver outwards. The driveshaft should un-click and start to come out. Push the hub assembly out of the way and remove the entire drive shaft. (Apologese for the fuzzy picture)
    3b.

    With both drive shafts out, let's move to the engine bay. Remove the battery, battery tray and the battery holder plate, this has two bolts on top and two bolts underneath, which don't need removing entirely, just loosening. You may find the the battery holder plate is stuck down still after removing the top bolts and loosening the bottom two, the plates can sometime have some sealant under them, use a flat screw driver to pry the plate up. Removing this give you extra space to work. You also need to remove the entire air box, this has 5 bolts holding it in place, two at the back right connecting it to the air filter, onw towards the front right and two on the left hand side of it.
    7.

    Next, there is a clutch line bracket just above the back of the starter motor, undo the bolt for this.
    8.

    9.

    Next unbolt the clutch slave cylinder, first unclip the connector for the lambda sensor, so you can get to the two bolts. Remove these two bolts and tuck the slave cylinder out towards the offside headlight out of harms way.
    11.

    Next up lets tackle the gear linkage, remove to two lock pins from the gear linkage.
    12.
    To remove the two linkage cable from the gearbox, you can either pull off the two spring clips or remove the 3 bolts. I went for the three bolts as they were easier to get to.
    13.
     
    Last edited: Thursday 17th Mar, 2016
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  2. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    I don't have a picture showing this but there is a earth wire on the gearbox that needs to be disconnected, as well as the reverse switch connector and the speed sensor connector at the back of the gearbox. Once these are disconnected the gearbox is "clear". The only thing stopping is coming off (aside from some more bolts left holding it on) is the subframe, which actually needs removing.

    Before we can get the subframe off though we need to get the exhaust off, the exhaust piece that is in the way starts after the manifold and goes all the way to the back box.
    Unplug both O2 sensor. Undo the two bolts holding the Cat onto the exhaust header.

    17.

    Do the same to the two bolts connecting the back box to the centre section
    19.

    You now have two rubber mounts to unhook off the hanging pegs. I find the best way to do this is push the rubber mount as far back as possible and then grease the front of the mount point. The rubber mount can now be pushed off the peg, with the grease on there is should now just glide off easily.
    Exhaust is now fully off.
    20.


    We now need to tackle the front and rear engine mounts (why ? well we'll be dropping the subframe later and the engine mounts hold the engine and gearbox onto the subframe).

    For the front mount, take off the three (there's one on the other side of the mount not in first picture below) 17mm bolts for the bracket and whilst you are here, you may as well take off the 14mm bolt going from engine side into gearbox (in the picture its the top one but the picture if from the underside, sot it's actually located at the bottom of the gearbox).
    21.
    18.

    With the mount loose you can now take out the bolt going through the mount. Thinking about it, if you are using an impact gun, you may want to loosen that bolt up first.

    Now moving to the rear mount, the pictures I took aren't brilliant but quite simply put there are three bolt on the mount that need to be removed and one on the gearbox (which was actually missing on this car from a previous job).

    22. 23.

    Remove the three bolts holding the bracket on to the subframe
    rear mount.

    Moving onto removing the subframe (finally). Lets start in the wheel arches, there's a bolt in each one on a bracket that needs removing.
    subframe side1. subframe side2.

    We're now ready to remove the four big bolts holding the subframe onto the chassis (only have pictures of two)
    25.
    26.

    At this point I had my hands full handling the subframe off the car, so I don't have any pics of how I pulled the sub frame down and out from under the car but I used a jack to hold up one side whilst I man handled the other (remember I'm working on my own here).

    29.


    Going back to the gearbox there are now only three bolt holding it on, two at the top of the gearbox (as shown in these two pics) and one halfway up the front of the gearbox, just under the starter motor. Another missing picture here but before removing the last three bolts off the gearbox don't forget to support the engine from underneath with a jack. Also the gearbox mount now needs to come off as well. 31.
    32.
    30 (2).
    I actually also removed the starter motor as well, this is held in with two bolts. Also with the gearbox still bolted on now is a good time to drain the gearbox of oil. If you don't you'll end up with gearbox fluid everywhere.
     
    Last edited: Friday 18th Mar, 2016
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  3. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    With the engine supported from underneath, all the gearbox bolts off and gearbox mount also off, it's finally time to actually remove the gearbox from the engine.

    This required a fair bit of tapping and prying before it came free, I had a jack underneath it to help me drop it to the ground slowly.

    Once again I had my hands full so didn't manage to get any pictures during this part.

    Here's the gearbox off the car :-
    35.

    Old pressure plate
    36.

    Old vs New ... old one is worn right down to the rivets ! 37.

    Pressure plate badly worn (vanes are flat)
    38. 40.

    New thrust bearing installed, shaft cleaned and greased 42. 43. 44.

    Clutch plate centred using a tool and bolts torqued (22Nm) in a criss cross pattern. It's really important to get the clutch centred correctly, otherwise you will have a hell of a job trying to get the gearbox on !
    45.
    Finished the day by getting the gearbox re-installed and few bolts tightened.
    46.

    So not a bad days work, considering I did everything on my own.

    I won't bother you with refit details as they are pretty much the reverse of the dismantle process.
     
    Last edited: Thursday 17th Mar, 2016
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  4. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Some additional information for reassembly, after getting the gearbox bolted back up to the engine, you want get the mount on the gearbox reattached and then bolted up.

    Once this is done you can remove the supporting jack under the engine.

    With the engine and gearbox supporting their own weight on the two mounts, it's time to get the subframe on, you want to get this into position and use something to support it there whilst you thread the bolts on by hand. I used a large trolley one side and some wood and a scissor jack on the other side. Once they are seated you can tighten further with a torque wrench, IIRC I torqued the bolts to 69 lb ft/93Nm (please verify this figure as my memory seems to be hazy on this one).

    With the subframe on it's time to get the two front and back mounts on.

    After this get the exhaust back on. I first hung the exhaust from the mounts, tightened up the front bolts then I cleaned up the rear joint to the back silencer and applied some exhaust putty and bolted it back together . You can now move onto getting the driveshafts back on both sides, the axle nut need to be tightened to 134 lb ft/181Nm. At this point and with still some clear access to the gearbox I took the opportunity to fill the gearbox with fresh gearbox oil.
    Below is a diagram showing the fill and drain bolts. To fill the gearbox open the fill hole and pour fluid into until the fluid starts to drip back out. The gearbox now has the correct level of fluid in it, you can refit the drain plug to the specified torque.
    Screenshot 2016-03-17 21.23.31.

    With this done, you can move back to the engine bay and commence connecting:- clutch slave cylinder, starter motor, gear linkage cables, wiring, battery tray, battery and finally airbox.

    Sit back and relax the job is now done.
     
    Last edited: Friday 18th Mar, 2016
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  5. legend-ary Moderator Staff Team

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    Good work @SpeedyGee :Thumbup:that sub-frame looks heavy!! I doubt anyone of us can do it on our own though... I am glad I never even considered doing the bearing on my EU8
     
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  6. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Thanks @legend-ary !

    Tell me about it, my arms were killing after this mammoth effort. What was worse than the sub frame was lifting the gearbox into place and pushing it onto the locating lugs
     
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  7. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Not only is it impressive that you did all that in one day, but also that you took the time to take all those photos. I doff my cap to you!
     
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  8. AccordCU2 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Wow that's impressive!
     
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  9. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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  10. AccordCU2 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Next time if you need fat strong lad to hold the subframe or gearbox give us a shout and I'll help you out or at least I'll try lol.
     
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  11. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Thanks for the kind offer buddy !
     
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  12. AccordCU2 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Anytime :Thumbup:
     
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  13. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    How far can you travel?
     
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  14. AccordCU2 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    For a beer anywhere:drinking:
     
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  15. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I've changed more clutches than I care to remember, but only one on my own - That was far easier than this job, and quite some time ago.
    A very impressive job for one, and a great addition to the guides @SpeedyGee .

    I hope the EU8's owner and those who use this guide appreciate what you've done. :salute:
     
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  16. Accord_N22 Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

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    Wow! Very impressive indeed.
    I have never attempted such a job before and probably never will.
    Massive respect SpeedyGee
     
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  17. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Thanks @Accord_N22 :Hey:

    These big jobs are frickin hard work, especially if done on your own but I do enjoy doing them. All in all it took me 18 hours.

    By the way I can't remember if I stressed this point enough but I would highly advise against doing such jobs on your own for safety reasons. I'm really well versed and really well equipped to do these jobs, so I can do these jobs safely on my own. But in general big jobs such as these should be a two man job, also you need to make sure that however you are jacking up the car or propping up the subframe or doing anything that you are doing it safely !
     
    Last edited: Friday 18th Mar, 2016
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