Suspension, Steering and Brakes 6th Generation Accord brakes

Discussion in '6th Generation (1997-2002)' started by SayamaAccord, Wednesday 9th Nov, 2011.

  1. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    The brakes on the 6th Generation Accord aren’t a problem, but they are something which as an owner you need to be aware of, and act on.

    Brakes and pads are consumables, so they will need changing during the life of the car. One thing about the Accord is that it can go through pads and discs relatively quickly, particularly the rears. Good old British salt from the winter roads on unprotected steel discs makes things a fair bit worse too.

    I owned my 6th Generation Accord for nine and a half years, and during that time, I must have changed the front discs and pads twice, and the rear discs and pads about three or four times. So if you have a 6th Generation and you want to look after it yourself, learn to change the oil and filter, and learn to change the pads and discs. You will save a bundle.

    I know people think, don’t take any chances with brakes, you need to know what you’re doing. Well yes that’s true, but if you take your time and approach it methodically and carefully, following instructions in a workshop manual, you can do it. No-one will ever give your brakes the same loving TLC you will devote to them yourself on a leisurely sunny Saturday afternoon.

    This isn’t a how-to on changing brake fluid or changing pads and discs, as these will be posted elsewhere on the forum. It’s more of a general owner’s overview and heads-up, together with some specific pointers gleaned from my ownership experience.

    You need to keep an eye on disc and pad wear. This should be checked by garages on a service but it won’t be when brake efficiency is checked on an MOT. You need to raise the car and remove the wheel. A cheap micrometer can measure the disc thickness to ensure it doesn’t fall below the specified minimum of [ ] mm (front) and [ ] mm (rear). You can visually inspect the pad thickness with the wheel off, and here the specified minimum is only [ ] mm but personally I wouldn’t let a pad get below about 3mm before I changed it.

    Ownership issues can include binding brakes, whose symptoms include a scraping noise which the pad makes as it continuously contacts the disc, or very hot wheels from the heat generated by the binding. Needless to say this can affect brake efficiency and therefore be dangerous.

    The causes can include pads themselves sticking in position against the disc, brake caliper slider pins sticking and therefore allowing the pads to slide back from the disc, and brake pistons not retracting fully when the brake is disapplied and therefore keeping the pad engaged when it shouldn’t be.

    All these different things very often boil down to just one thing – lack of necessary maintenance. Accord brakes are fussy and need proper looking after. But if the discs and pads get changed every two or 3 years, the lubrication and maintenance that goes with that should be enough to keep things in good order.

    Another problem can be metallic grinding. This will probably come from corrosion of the disc, especially if you buy cheap discs. A good scraping off of the winter rust, especially from the outer rim edge of the disc with a cold chisel, plus a bit of a clean-up, will usually resolve this.

    There are one or two considerations and issues to think about:

    Choice of brake pads and disks. Go for Honda if you can afford them. If you can’t, go for a reputable aftermarket brand such as Mintex. They use higher quality steel alloy in the discs, which is less prone to cracking and warping which you definitely don’t want happening to you at speed, and less prone to excessive corrosion. (I found that one out from experience, having to scrape rust off cheap front discs annually for three years every Spring to get rid of a grinding noise, until I got fed up and replaced them). Expensive boy-racer grooved and slotted discs and super-duper pads? Some say they stop you quicker; some say don’t stop you quicker but warp much more easily; I don’t know because I’ve never tried them. And I never will.

    Disc removal 1. There are a couple of large Philips head screws attaching the disc to the hub. These aren’t always very easy to undo and if you aren’t careful you can mangle the heads and get yourself in trouble. The solution is to buy or borrow an impact driver before you do the job. One swift whack on the end of that and the screw is undone.

    Disc removal 2. The discs can sometimes bind to the hub, and you can’t shift them by pulling or hammering. Honda discs, and good quality aftermarket copies, have a couple of threaded holes to screw a couple of bolts in. When you insert the bolts, these prise the disc off no problem. Two bolts to fit these holes were supplied free with the first ever set of discs and pads I bought from Honda a while back. So I keep them in my garage and I’ve used them several times since. I don’t know if these are still supplied by Honda with their pads and discs, so it’s worth asking your local Honda parts department.

    Caliper windback tool. You need to get the caliper piston back into the caliper to put the brake back together. Don’t mess about with G-clamps or water pump pliers or your Granny’s spare set of false teeth. They might work on other brakes but they won’t work on the 6th Generation Accord calipers. Save yourself a lot of time and grief and buy a decent brake caliper windback tool. The one they sell in Halfords does the job fine.
    Caliper slider grease. Red rubber grease ought to be used. Other stuff can attack rubber apparently.

    Torque wrench. If there’s one part of the car where you need to be sure the bolts are the correct tightness, not too tight and not too loose, it’s the brakes. So I’d recommend you buy one or borrow one, and use it for this job.
     
  2. Rhys Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Novice here !

    Hi I have some of the symptoms you have described here like a rubbing, grinding noise and also today noticed a squeeling noise under medium speed all of which go away once the brakes are pressed. Also I have corrosion on the rear discs. Not long owned my 6th Generation accord 1.8 VTEC s but I am more than happy with it already :Smile: I am a bit of a novice at general maintenance of any car really, I did change the discs on my old 106 gti many years ago and I want to be able to do these things myself mainly to save money but also I want to learn about these things. Is there a thread that I could access to guide me through changing all the discs and pads on my car or any type of help would be greatly appreciated :Smile: I got some kit already like a trolley jack and axle stands. Thanks in advance
     
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  3. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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  4. Rhys Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    I take it that its the same process for the 6th Generation as it is for the 7th Generation ? Just got to get some money together for the discs and pads all round and I'll be on the case :Smile: weather will not be a factor in this as I have a big warehouse at the top of my street that's under cover :Smile:. Im determined to do this
     
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  5. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Yes, 6th Generation should pretty much be the same as the 7th in principle.
     
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  6. Rhys Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Any suggestions on brands and where to get good cheap discs and pads ?
     
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  7. carrind Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi I just done, my front pads, I went for pagid pads, from euro car parts. £28 (£21 after discount). Ppl on here seem fixated on buying dealer parts, but just buy the best u can afford. Honda pads are about £55, while u get everything with them in terms of shims, bolts etc, I'm not sure they will be twice as good. Honda parts seen to be £30 more expensive, which isnt bad, but for pads is a no, disc a maybe, bearings and hubs etc I would spend the extra. There is a site lings Honda, which has all parts, numbers and prices, take a look then u can make up ur own mindmind
     
  8. Rhys Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Thank you carrind I'll take a look. Unfortunately I have been unable to afford the parts I was after :-( I worked nights last week and was expecting a big pay packet but that was not the case. I was looking forward to doing this on my own :-( I think will have to do the front and back on separate weeks to break the cost down. It needs to be done as the front ones have developed a rather annoying and embarrassing squeel lol and the rear have some rust on them
     
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  9. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Brakes are an important safety device on your car , so when you buy safety equipment with the lowest price in mind .. just ask yourself will it last or will it save your and your families life in case of a emergency?

    Honda parts are tested to hill under all circumstances do these low cost parts offer the same?
     
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  10. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    I`d go for original Honda pads too. I've had noise issues with Pagids before, swapped to Honda pads and never heard a squeal again.
     
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  11. Rhys Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    I have phoned the local parts supplier who I have bought from before and they usually supply brembo or mintex both of which are reputable companies so I will with them I think. If I could afford genuine parts then they would be the obvious choice. I don't think I would buy the cheaper brands, I've always been a bit sceptical when it comes to buying brands I've never heard of.
     
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