Off-Topic 70mph Speed Cameras to be deployed on Motorways

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Chat' started by Ichiban, Monday 10th Feb, 2014.

  1. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    News: 70mph Speed Cameras to be deployed on Motorways from pocketgpsworld

    Speed cameras are to be installed on two sections of the M25 to catch motorists exceeding the 70mph limit.

    This is the first time that speed cameras have been deployed on UK motorways to enforce the national speed limit, previously they were used only on variable speed limit stretches and road works.

    The cameras are being deployed to improve traffic flow and to allow the hard shoulder to be used as an extra lane.

    A stretch of the M1 in South Yorkshire has also been identified as a location for the installation of 70mph speed cameras.

    This news comes in the same week as it was revealed that the government is proposing a 60mph limit for a 32-mile stretch of the M1 that would apply between 7am and 7pm, seven days a week.
  2. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Does it have a 10% tolerance or is it just a myth - EG under 77mph you wouldn't get fined?
  3. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Any speed over the limit is an absolute offense, and you can be prosecuted
    But there are guidelines from ACPO.

    Here they are, section 9.6 is the important bit.
    Chunkylover53 likes this.
  4. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    So its 73mph - I'm ashamed to admit I believed the 10% myth, thank god for cruise control.
  5. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    No the 70 limit is 79. 73 is the device tolerance.
  6. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    I was under the impression that:
    70-73 - No fine/points
    73-79 - Fine + points

    Or have I misunderstood it?
    DeviateDefiant likes this.
  7. AccordCU2 Premium Member Club Supporter

    70 mph on M25.Can you even reach those speeds on glorified car park that is M25?
  8. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
    All car speedometers have a 10% tolerance due to the equipment being mass produced. Therefore if you're doing 70 mph 10% is 7 mph, plus they then add an additional 2 mph to remove any doubt and ensure the 10% tolerance can't be used as an excuse. 70+7+2=79. 79 mph is the minimum speed they will prosecute you for being over. The 73 refers to the tolerance of the equipment, so they can't stop you and accuse you or doing 72 in a 70 when the device has an inbuilt tolerance of 3 mph.
  9. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Anything over 70 you can be fined, but the guidelines are not to until you reach 79. 79 - 86 they can offer a speed awareness course if they want to. Over 96 you're off to court to see the magistrate.
  10. candobill Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    it all depends if you drive bad or safe at 80mph, I have passed un- marked cars at 80 and just been pointed at, when the conditions were fine but seen people getting pulled when doing same when conditions were bad. its up to the assessment of the situation by the person who is there to monitor safety :Tea: I have been in the middle lane doing over the limit and a guy in the outside lane was cruising at 80 he got stopped by un-marked behind me :Thumbup:
  11. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Speedo are only allowed a 8% tolerance as per the vehicle approval regulations. But more importantly they are not allowed to read under, thus the reason for the tolerance.
  12. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Sorry I've been working on the essay since noon so I'm probably off the ball - If somebody does 77mph, if a fixed speed camera clocks them at that speed then they don't get fined/points due to manufacturer tolerance? (10% tolerance seems massive btw)

    Or is it just plain over 70 and you get points on your license - which can't be right if speedometers have a 10 percent tolerance because then somebody could unknowingly be doing 77?
  13. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    The police don't care for care for the tolerances built into speedos or GPS units or anything.
    But as I said your speedo is not allowed to read under. So if you are 1mph over the limit and PC plod is having a bad day you can get points. But it is very unlikely. Section 9.2 in the PDF I linked explains this.
    Speeding is an absolute offence, there is no mitigation. But the guidelines are there to provide a little bit of clarity.
    Chunkylover53 likes this.
  14. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Okay makes a lot more sense now, so basically:
    70-73 - pulled over and fined by a policeman BUT can be challenged successfully by citing the PDF
    70-73 - fixed speed cams won't bother?
    73+ - fine + pts

    Assuming I've finally got it, how can somebody be sure their speedo is accurate. For example my car was hopefully accurate when it left the showroom 15 yrs ago but now is it still accurate seeing it has never been tested/calibrated by MOT testers?
  15. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    The guidelines are that you won't be fined until you reach 79, by either a policeman or speed camera.

    But you can be if the police want to. A lot of it is down to how you are driving.
    But you won't be allowed to use the guidelines as a defence.
    Only way you can get an idea of your speedo accuracy is by using a sat nav.
  16. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
    I heard 10% several years ago so it would make sense that the tolerances have been tightened up since then. But 10% is what's still used in the table. I assume this is because there's still a lot of older cars on the road with less accurate speedo's.

    The Accord speedo seems to be quite accurate. I've compared mine to the factory sat nav and it's only reading 2 mph over at 60mph.
  17. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    Building on what Rob brought up, even if you did get fined for doing just a few miles over the limit - or within the given tolerances for the equipment they used, it wouldn't be hard to contest the fine.

    Another note, if it's an actual bobby issuing a ticket, you can also not accept it. Signing the ticket is agreeing to a contract stating that you are willing to pay a fine, like all police documents it's written in legalese (where must is synonymous with may, order with offer etc. - that's no joke).

    Sometimes they'll just leave you to it, sometimes they'll ask you to come down to the station, but it's worth fighting for.
  18. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    If you refuse the ticket, I believe it's an automatic summons to court.

    If a copper wants to do you for a few miles over the speed limit, you've probably pissed him off for some reason.

    But as I said before speeding is an absolute offence, the guidelines are only that.
  19. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    It's at the digression of the officer from that I understand. If they haven't got the proper evidence or there know there's room to contest it, they're are likely to not push as much. But again as you say, unless you've pissed them off.

    You can also write to the local highway authority and request a copy of the traffic order for the exact location, which will tell you whether the limit there has actually legally been set (you'd be surprised how many signs go up and the right paperwork isn't done).
  20. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    If they're a traffic cop you're screwed regardless.

    They were known as jury nobblers in London, because if a traffic cop took the stand the jury went the other way with their verdict.