Suspension, Steering and Brakes Brake lubricants

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by ampers, Wednesday 5th Aug, 2015.

  1. ampers Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi,
    I'm about to replace rear pads and discs because Honda Bristol (at MOT), say rear offside inner pad 75%(3mm left), worn with wear indicator rubbing on lip of disc.
    MOT should have checked efficiency and no sign of overheating or brake noise.

    Anyway, my confusion is about what lubricants to use for 1. piston seals, 2. slider pins, 3. contact points on pads with the carrier, i.e. on rear and corners of pads.
    PS. this is a 2010 2.0 petrol manual saloon

    Any advice would be gratefully received.

    Ampers.
     
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  2. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Red rubber grease for the piston seals, if you're really sure you want to delve about inside the caliper (which may not be necessary?). I'd use silicone grease for the sliding parts and rear of the pads.
     
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  3. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    1. piston seals= unless you are changing them you leave them as is no need for lubrication , if replacing the seal use Silicone rubber grease
    2. slider pins,= high temperature silicon grease.
    3. contact points on pads with the carrier, i.e. on rear and corners of pads. M77 molycote grease

    Red grease not a fan off, it does sod all.
     
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  4. ampers Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks both.

    I had planned to use red rubber grease for the piston seals, silicon grease for the sliding pins and ceratec grease for the back of the pads.
    The reason I was thinking of greasing the piston seals was that Honda's comments implied to me that perhaps the piston was sticking,(not retracting easily).
    Additionally, I was only thinking of cleaning the piston seal and area, carefully of course and nothing further.
     
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  5. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    if the piston is sticking then the calliper needs a full overhaul, lubricating will not help.
     
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  6. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    As CJ says, once a piston starts sticking, its full overhaul time.

    A piston normally suffers pitting from moisture which over time eats into the metal causing it to bind, imagine trying to push sandpaper smoothly across a smooth surface. Once the damage is done, you can't turn it back again. Here is a picture to show what I mean, left is a pitted piston which would likely have been sticking, to the right is a new one. The difference is obvious.

    piston.
     
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  7. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    In other words: never, ever economise on some brake fluid. Change it in time (manual says: 3 years). I changed on my wife's Civic 1,5 year ago and last week again. I don't want any expensive troubles.
    It's the brake fluid that carries the moisture/water over time.
     
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  8. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    I change brake fluid yearly it's expensive but the brakes are sharp.
     
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  9. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Likewise, I change my brake fluid once a year as well. For the sake of £30, I do it just before winter hits so I have fresh fluid over the winter months. Considering what brakes do, I think its a cheap thing to do yearly.

    Touch wood - never had that dreaded Honda rear caliper seizing issue yet doing this.
     
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  10. micko Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Denmark micko copenhagen
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    I use silicone grease for parts that have contact with rubber and kobber grease for the place where the pads sits. Never had a problem. And every time I change my wheels I take the brakes apart and give them a good clean.
    - - - Updated - - -
    On our Honda the pads gets stuck because the edges on the pads don't fit perfectly. They need to be filled a bit so they can move freely. The last one I change I couldn't even gets the pads in because of the big and ruff edges.
     
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  11. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Genuine OEM pads? I would check for muck buildup on the carriers.
     
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  12. micko Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Denmark micko copenhagen
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    OEM pads to. They are better but most off them I have changed still needed a bit of filling. That's not only for the accord but also on my old Civic and my friends hondas to.

    And I cleaned everything whit metal brushes when I take the brakes off. And yes u are right there are a lot of dirt that's built OP under the metal carrier.
     
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  13. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Agree. I find that all pads need to have the edges smoothed a little to avoid future binding problems.
     
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  14. ampers Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks for all the replies, just one further point, with regard to winding in the pistons, is this done clockwise on both off and near side?
    I only ask because I've found references to clockwise and counter clockwise on this forum and on my previous car, X type Jag, one side was clockwise and the other counter, that is to say in the direction of forward motion.
     
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  15. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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  16. ampers Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thank you.
     
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