Suspension, Steering and Brakes Broken wheel stud

Discussion in '6th Generation (1997-2002)' started by skhell, Monday 26th Dec, 2011.

  1. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Yesterday I had a weird noise coming from the brakes and today I decided to investigate. To my surprise, when I started to undo the wheel nuts, one of them was quite hard, and very difficult to turn the wrench... From the early beginning, I knew what was going to be the result, a snapped wheel stud. I remember hitting a pothole while driving at 120/130kmh. I wonder if it could be the cause this. The stud broke at the base of the nut, leaving about 10/15mm of stud. The car is a year 2000, 1.8 Accord, and according to 2000 HONDA ACCORD 1.8ILS FRONT BRAKE - Original Honda Parts | Lings Honda | Honda Cars the stud can be replaced. Now, the big question, anyone knows if its possible to replace the stud without removing the wheel hub? If it's like this one, I should be in luck: How to replace a wheel stud bolt - YouTube If that doesn't work, I might need to remove the wheel hub to install the new stud. Meanwhile, saw a couple of guys who gridded the the back of the stud just enough to get room to install the stud: see minute 3:50 Lug Nut Stud Replacement - YouTube see minute 1:49 Wheel stud replacement - 93 Honda DelSol - YouTube Anyone with good info on this one?
     
  2. Beefy Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    caunt realy say for sure unless i had a look. you can get away with it on 7th Generation Accords by bending the backing plate out of the way.
     
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  3. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Studs shearing off are one of two main reasons A ) being over tighten way beyond it torque settings (6th Generation torque setting are the same as the 7th Generation at 108NM) B ) is old metal fatigue.

    Now if the latter is prolonged during the cars life metal fatigue is induced faster. The bolts are tempered to get the high tensile strength in them. So hitting the pothole at 120 kmph could be the trigger but I doubt it will cause the nut to be stuck. When you snapped the wheel stud where you able to get the wheel off to inspect the rear of the Hub? by the you tube clips I would assume you haven't been able to ?

    Now if I recall correctly the studs on the 7th Generation have a bevelled edge towards the rear and the hub is does have direct access to grip on the bevelled edge. The steel casting on the hub prevent any tool to get in there and the wheel studs have spines on them which have to line up and pressed in correctly. However on the 6th Generation it may not be that advance by looking at the cutaway from the front side you would assume the studs can be pushed out from the front. I cannot say for definitively as I have never worked one.

    But I strongly advise you don't grind a stud to fit it , that is just bad advise and it will eventually fail with bad consensus. Think about your safety. Another reason why the guys has disabled comments on his clip. :Whistle:


    6th gen front knuckle.PNG


    Get some pictures up when you can.
     
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  4. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

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    ahh good to know you can do that .. I have learnt something today...cheers beefy

    I suppose you could potentially do that on the 6th Generation,
     
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  5. Beefy Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    considdering the studs are quite cheep i would buy one and see how you go. get an old wheel nut and use that to hit the stud inwards. this is the point where you can either get the stud out or not as i am not sure of the clearance between the hub and knuckle. best removing the caliper, carryer and disc and rotate the hub so the broken stud lines up with the opening. the next problem IF the stud passes the knuckle is being able the hit the back of the stud so it locates fully in the hub.
     
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  6. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Yep, that's right, and I have been using a torque wrench to tighten the bolts for a few years...


    Yes, I did removed the wheel, but I have to remove the brake calliper and possibly the disk to see things clearly. Later I will take off the wheel to see the size of the bolts of the brake calliper, to decide if I need to buy new sockets to remove it...

    I think it also have the spines, but I guess the hub doesn't have spines to aligned them with the spines of the stud. Just insert it, and then push it out with a bolt a


    As a temporary solution, if I really need, I might grind the bolt, and then when I have the time, replace all 4 studs together with with the bearing...

    Later when I take off the wheel again, I will take some pictures, although I guess it will not show much...
     
  7. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Here is a picture of what it looks like from the inside. If I have any chance of fitting the new stud without grinding it, I will have to bend the splash guard.

    p1120213n.th.

     
    Last edited: Tuesday 27th Dec, 2011
  8. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    WOW virtually rust free front end!! yup if you bend the splash guard to get some room.bend it gently so you can reshape it without any issues. don't forget to buy the brake bleeder cap to keep the grim away.
     
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  9. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Yeah, usually in Portugal we don't have a rust problem.
     
  10. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Anyone knows if there are after-market wheel studs, and where to buy them, preferably? I have been looking at local shops and can't find any. In ebay I just find long bolts...

    The one I ordered from Honda is about +10€, which is allot if I decide to replace the 4 in a near future...
     
  11. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    Do you really want to replace all 4 though?
     
  12. Beefy Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    you won't get one non-gen. replace the one that is snapped and check the others. just make sure the wheel nuts screw on to the studs freely and that there threads are in good condition. preferably torque the nuts to 108nm or if by hand only use a small bar or wheel brace and don't swing on it like mad. i reccon the stud that has snapped was cross threaded or over tightened for it to snap on removal. no point in replacing somthing for no real reason.
     
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  13. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    The thing is: If I do need to remove the bearing to fit the stud as it should be installed, I will probably replace the bearing, as it will probably be damaged and I thing its not a good idea to "re-fit" a wheel bearing.

    If I do replace the wheel bearing, I might as well replace the 4 studs, don't want to risk breaking another stud and have to fit another bearing...

    About this stud, it was not cross threaded and it was not overtightened, mostly because I had rotated the tires a few weeks ago and I rembember that all went smooth and no overtightened. It might have been overtightened in the past, mostly by the guys in the tyres shop....
     
    Last edited: Wednesday 28th Dec, 2011
  14. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    It's done, although not in the recommended way...

    I had to cut the old but to get it out, and grind the new bolt to install it. Even after after grind head of the stud, I had to bend the splash-guard, and force it with a bit. It got with some marks in the threads, but nothing significant.

    Any way, this is just a temporary fix, until I get the time and the tools to remove the wheel bearing.

    Now, one question to the experts: If I remove the wheel hub with an hydraulic press, can I re-use the old bearing? Removing the wheel hub will remove just a small part of the bearing, is it viable to just press it back again after changing the stud?

    Later will post some pictures that I took while replacing the bolt :cool:

    Oh, I still only have 3 nuts, the guys at Honda ordered the wrong nut...
     
  15. Beefy Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    i wouldn't reccomend re-using a wheel bearing once it is pressed out. they are quite cheep non-genuine if cost is an issue. if your gonna do a job buddy do it propperly.
     
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  16. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

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    I am amazed at the front end even with frequently cleaning and protection you could never achieve that in the UK . Well you could if you never drove it and park it in climate controlled environment!!Even the brake hose ends have no rust AMAZING...I may get my first gen shipped and parked at your place you look after it and when I am in town I can borrow it.:cool:
     
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  17. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    That was my first thought, but needed a second opinion.
     
    Last edited: Wednesday 28th Dec, 2011
  18. skhell Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Shure, there's plenty of space left in my garage, the street :Smile:
    Just don't forget to also leave keys, so I can take the rust out of the engine :cool:
     
  19. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    I'd rather just emigrate to all that sunshine lol.
     
  20. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    Haha, I like it...not much rust in his engines though, I can assure you...he's only gonna ride shotgun in my car lol