Suspension, Steering and Brakes Changing brake fluid

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by scotsgent, Monday 6th Jun, 2016.

  1. scotsgent Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scotland Terry Fort William
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    I have an Eezibleed tool.

    I have used it with success on VW/Skoda vehicles.

    But I have read that the Honda Brake fluid reservoir cap is difficult to seal (that is purchasing an extra one which would work with the Eeezibleed).

    Is this so?

    If it is the case, what's the best alternative method? Is pumping the brakes with a helper an acceptable method? (I think there are some instances of seals being 'inverted' using this method - though maybe this is a myth?

    I would prefer a simple method which doesn't involve spending cash since its only going to be a once every couple of years job.

    Any suggestions of a simple effective method for an Accord?

    Cheers, Terry
     
  2. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    Without tools: indeed pumping with a helper on the wheel.
    With tools: you can suck out the fluid at each wheel.
    No issues at all to be expected with eather method. Nothing special about this circuit.
    By the way: a brake fluid reservoir cap should be difficult to seal. They're supposed to be open all the time. If not, brakes might fail.
     
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  3. stuscrv Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Spain stu lanzarote
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    Don't know if you can still get them but years ago I bought a simple orange tube with a built in non return valve. I used it on my own many times with great success, you just opened the nipple ( with tube attached ) get in car and pump pedal as many times as needed, only draw back you had to get in and the car and keep topping up master cylinder. It only cost a few pounds and I had it for years.
    Recently Honda told me my fluid had a high water content so was thinking of changing myself as I think they wanted about £100 by the time I'd played vat etc.
    If I can still buy the tube it would cost the price of fluid etc .
    Would it matter on my old heap what fluid I use as I'd be changing it not mixing ?
     
  4. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    You can only use DOT 3 or 4 brake fluid from a sealed (!!) container.
    Nothing else. Don't experiment with your braking system. It does matter what fluid you use.
     
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  5. ampers Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I've just bled and changed fluid using the mityvac 8020 vacuum pump. First time I've used it.
    Costs about £40, and quite easy to use with no danger of seal reversal, just keep an eye on fluid level.
     
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  6. stuscrv Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Spain stu lanzarote
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    I won't tell you about the time I sprang a leak and used washing up liquid to get home !
    Was years ago when all shops were closed.
     
  7. legend-ary Moderator Staff Team

    United Kingdom Legend The Big Smoke
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    Ezibleed kit is exactly that. Costs £5 and is just a white bottle with a bit of tubing and a non return valve
     
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  8. stuscrv Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Spain stu lanzarote
    463
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    There was no bottle with mine, just a tube, the original eezy bleed kit had a tyre valve on it so you would attach to each tyre and use the air to blow through.
     
  9. legend-ary Moderator Staff Team

    United Kingdom Legend The Big Smoke
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    That's a more advanced kit. The basic one is the one I explained.
    - - - Updated - - -
    If you think about it the old tyre you will use air from actually contains air that has been in there for a while and it contains moisture etc. So using moist air to replace brake fluid which absorbs water is kind of an interesting thing to do.
     
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  10. stuscrv Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Spain stu lanzarote
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    Don't blame me Z I didn't invent it lol but yes often wondered about that.
     
  11. scotsgent Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scotland Terry Fort William
    34
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    The Eezibleed kit I own and I mentioned in my opening post is tyre pressure fed. Its been used for years and whilst there may be theoretical disadvantages, its generally well thought of.

    The Honda Accord doesn't have a conventional screw type thread on the reservoir cap and so will not take the pressure generated.

    I see the one-way valve in a tube system mentioned, but on Amazon at least, it draws some poor feedback for slipping off the nipple when in use.

    As I said, I won't be spending any more money on something I will only be doing once in a couple of years and so will probably revert to the two man 'pump the pedal' routine.

    Cheers, Terry
     
  12. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I bought this last year.

    Sealey VS820

    IMG_20150809_140413.

    I also bought the universal adaptor (clamps on to the MC) to be able to use it on the Accord.

    IMG_20150809_140306.

    Makes it much easier to do this job single handed.
     
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  13. scotsgent Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scotland Terry Fort William
    34
    19
    I completed a fluid change today.
    The method I used is what is referred to on youtube as the 'one person method'.
    I think it was a good method, it's simple but you need to be methodical.

    Essentially, I used a fairy liquid bottle and suitable poly tube of the correct diameter for the nipples.
    Filled the bottle to about 25% with the old fluid decanted from the reservoir with a turkey baster and fixed the tube through the bottle cap so its outlet was just on the bottom of the bottle. I drilled a couple of extra wee holes through the cap to allow air to escape as the fluid level rose during the process.

    I then sat this bottle inside a larger bottle (1 litre plastic milk carton with the top section cut off). I then filled around the inner bottle with gravel, (this then made a very stable construction which couldn't fall over).

    I then removed all the dirty fluid I could from the reservoir with the baster and then filled it to its fullest level with fresh, clean fluid.

    I slipped the ring spanner over the nipple at the caliper and then attached the tube to the nipple.

    Starting with the furthest wheel from the reservoir, I cracked each nipple in turn and gently pumped about 25 times forcing out old fluid and replenishing with new, stopping and refilling the reservoir as needed, (checking every 5 strokes). I placed a small block of wood under the pedal to limit the downward stroke to about 75% of normal travel.

    There is some anecdotal talk of air leaking out/in of the nipple threads, so I coated the base of each nipple with grease prior to cracking it.

    After each wheel was complete, I decanted the old fluid from the Fairy bottle back to the 25% level in preparation for the next wheel.

    I used the entire litre bottle of fluid, visually seeing the colour change in the tube at each wheel when the old fluid was replaced by new.

    Went for a test run, all fine. Only cost was the fluid.

    The key to making this a trouble free experience is to 'over-check' the fluid level in the reservoir at every opportunity. To run out and suck air in would be a real cock-up. Also make sure your tube is well fixed in the bottle so its outlet is always well covered with fluid. This method sucks as well as pushes but providing the outlet is always well covered by fluid then its safe

    Cheers, Terry
     
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  14. civicric84 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Oxford
    50
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    When using the sealey pressure blender what is the recommended/safe psi for the Accords brake master cycling when changing the fluid.
     
  15. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I'll look it up and let you know.
     
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  16. civicric84 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Oxford
    50
    13
    Thanks nels. Did look on google but just lots of how to guides no mention on psi rating for when pumping brake fluid into master cylinder. Looks quite simple how to do it. Did you use DOT 4 fluid? Any one know if DOT 5.1 is ok for our Accords.
     
  17. scotsgent Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scotland Terry Fort William
    34
    19
    See handbook:
    "Always use genuine Honda brake fluid or an equivalent from a sealed container that is marked DOT 3 or DOT 4 only. Brake fluid marked DOT 5 is not compatible with your vehicles braking system".

    Cheers, Terry
     
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  18. civicric84 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Oxford
    50
    13
    I read that DOT 5 is silicone based but DOT 5.1 isn't and might be compatible with our braking system
     
  19. legend-ary Moderator Staff Team

    United Kingdom Legend The Big Smoke
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    but if DOT 4 is good enough is there an incentive to go for 5.1?
    The system was designed for 4.
     
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  20. scotsgent Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scotland Terry Fort William
    34
    19
    Yes.....the handbook is quite clear; DOT 3 or 4 only.
    Cheers, Terry