Engine & Gearbox DPF, Diesel Particle Filter: How Does It Work?

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by Ichiban, Sunday 6th Nov, 2011.

  1. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    With the advent if euro 5 emission within the UK ,Honda had to adopt the DPF (Diesel Particulate filter) on all Honda Accords sold in the UK. The I-CTDI on the European continent was already using DPF for several years so the data and experiences were helpful in designing the 8th Generation DPF. The Honda DPF system on the 8th Generation has not seen major failures yet in the UK.When problems have arisen Honda have been proactively fixing issues and evolving into a refined system via ECU updates and software fixes.

    At this moment in time DPF are actively and widely hated technology, you don’t have to go far within search engines to see endless posts on all major car forums to find owners venting their frustration at the cost fixing the DPF system. Owners have taken to extreme measure of removing DPF, deleting the DPF function within the ECU and tuning them for more power, with varied success and not to mention engine failures.

    Some manufacturers have failed to deploy reliable system some are getting there gradually, and some have nearly perfected the system. On a personal level and seeing these cars for four years I would say the Honda system really good. This is provided all owners are aware of the caveats and proactively know what they can do to limit DPF related issues you may never encounter any problem on a STOCK engines. Owners of a tuned ECU you don't have any leg to stand on for support and warranty via Honda.

    This thread is to give HK members and all potential Accord diesel owners an insight how the Honda DPF system works and quash any misconception regarding the DPF system.


    Figure one shows the two separate warning lights that can be illuminated for this system.

    8thGenDPFdisplay.

    A) At less than 7g the DPF system will automatically clean itself whilst driving once the DPF is up to correct operating temperature.

    B) At 7-11g the system will attempt to clean itself whilst driving regardless of DPF temperature.

    C) At 11-15g the system will alert the driver by blinking the DPF warning light on the dashboard. The owner should then follow the driving instruction explained in the owner’s manual to help clean the system. What is it? This requires a constant speed of at least 37mph to be maintained for up to 15 minutes. The best thing you can do is go for a 20 mile motorway run. Majority of the times this cures the warning.

    D) Above 16g the system will shut down to prevent damage due to a blockage occurring and the warning light will then be permanently illuminated.(Picture A) .If the owners continues driving with this light on permanently then the message may change to the exclamation mark symbol.(Picture B) .At this time you will need to go to the Honda dealer for them to hook up the HDS system to check whether you has a system fault or blocked . If they find the system above 16g then carry out a forced regeneration and check if there are any outstanding software and ECU updates.

    DPFSystemDiagram.

    DieselParticulateFilterDPFConverter.

    Tips

    A few tips you can do to keep the DPF troublefree.

    Always carry a litre of DPF compliant oil in the boot as stated here Avoid mixing oils which are no compliant as it leads to issues. You should not be making this mistake.Make sure all the drivers of your car are aware of this so careless mistakes can be avoided.


    Engine Oil Level Increase on the i-DTEC Engines get your dealer to look up their database to ensure your car has the latest software updates and patches to ensure troublefree motoring. Ask them nicely to show you how it’s done they will be glad to show you.
     
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  2. bruceCU2 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks for this - really helpful. :Smile:
     
    Ichiban likes this.
  3. rhinogolf Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    york
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    Been thinking of upgrading to 8th Generation after all trouble with my 7th but as car will be a taxi all i can see is trouble with the DPF and endless trips to Honda,am i right thinking down that line or will the car get up to temperature with all short runs and stuck in traffic.
     
    Last edited: Saturday 4th Feb, 2012
  4. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Dave it simpler than that bud have a read of this.

    I have been advising people to stop believing everything negative you hear about DPF's , DPF on other cars have issues Honda are better.
     
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  5. rhinogolf Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    york
    330
    13
    So would you think the 8th Generation would be an ideal taxi (all things been equal) come june all new car replacements for taxis in York have to meet euro 5 emissions so i could get away with a lower emission car for a few more years i was also after a auto but most of the reviews have been negative on the autos
     
  6. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Bud for Taxi I strongly recommend the auto,I would even go further and state if you want a 8th Generation Diesel it should be the Auto.The engine torque is matched beautifully to the autobox it a joy to drive the car. I would say it is brilliant and a fun to drive car.

    Now for the reviews lets face it Honda are never appreciated in Europe as it not made by Germans. If Honda was a German manufacturer they would be go raving about it :Angry:..Honda has made the auto box for the I-DTEC internally themselves,they have not outsourced it like German manufacturer do. The unfair comparisons sighting its not a close ratio six speed box it not the top end in auto box technology.

    So all these reviews slate it for not conforming to the Germans standard . utter garbage!! Dave get into a Honda dealer take the auto diesel for a extended test drive you will be mighty impressed.

    The best part there is no clutch problems :Wink:
     
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    SayamaAccord likes this.
  7. rhinogolf Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    york
    330
    13
    Is that the same for both saloon and tourer
     
  8. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    I test drove a saloon and could say the Tourer will also perfom excellently. Get the 8th Generation brouchers from Get a brochure | Cars | Honda (UK)
     
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  9. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,174
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    You are welcome :Smile:
     
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  10. Paul Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Still not driven an 8th Generation. I daren't. I'll want one and the leg iron says now!
     
  11. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Snap! I'd love an 8th Generation Tourer
     
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  12. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    Yup and what's more I've seen a couple of manual 2.4 8th Generation Tourers on AutoTrader recently...so they are out there. :cool:
     
  13. Paul Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Stop it Cliff. Don't tempt me :Smile:
     
  14. AccordCU2 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Paul you can try mine anytime:Grin:
     
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  15. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    Get in ! :cool:
     
  16. jrd Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I knew as soon as i got a test drive that it was the car for me. I was worried at first that all the short journeys i made(5miles each way to work) would cause problems with the DPF but nothing in three years of ownership. and the automatic gearbox is superb, especially when used with the steering wheel mounted paddles.
     
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  17. Gazza Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Gazza Borough Green
    28
    3
    Hi
    I know it depends on how the car is driven, but how often would you expect a Regeneration cycle take place is it say every 300 miles or 3000 miles.
     
  18. Tyrbiter Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I saw someone else suggesting that his DPF regenerated somewhere in the 750-1000 miles covered range, but it's going to be entirely dependent on whether there is sufficient hot gas flow to burn off anything deposited during any low speed running while in traffic. If you do enough mileage at a reasonable speed then there may be no obvious regeneration at all if the exhaust gas temperature is high enough to burn off any soot deposited.

    My car showed up a DPF warning and took four or five 35 mile runs to clear with a total time on the road of a bit under 4 hours with speeds in the 40-70mph range, I suspect that if I had been able to sustain the higher end of that range for longer it would not have taken so long to clear.

    I wonder if there is an easy way to find out what the pressure drop across the DPF is at a given moment? The sensor is at the front of the engine compartment and clearly could be monitored. I bet that a dealer could determine the state of the DPF by reading back the ECU data too. From the description that was posted the ECU knows what is going on well below the level at which the warning light comes on so it should be possible to find out and indeed the Tunap people did some measurements to check the effect of their DPF cleaning products.
     
  19. SayamaAccord Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    I remember reading about 600 miles somewhere but as you say it will vary with driving conditions.
     
  20. sgoaty Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Scott
    49
    26
    Hi there

    First post sorry its asking a question ill go make my intros shortly.

    Why is a forced regen considered such a bad thing?
    Thanks
    Scott
     
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