Detailing First DA polisher

Discussion in 'Detailing & Cleaning' started by Harvey, Sunday 24th Apr, 2016.

  1. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Ok guys, I will be looking for my first DA polisher over the summer as and when funds become available.
    Has anyone got any suggestions as to which machine to buy? I've seen lots of DAS6 machines listed from all sorts of manufacturers, but got tempted by the dodo juice branded one, think it came with pads and was about £110.

    Aside from the machine suggestions on what compounds etc should I use?
     
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  2. Nels Moderator Staff Team

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  3. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Cheers @Nels I did see the Kestrel ones listed but was unsure about its quality and or reliability, but if lots of people are using them then it would be worth a punt.

    I do have some Meguirs Ultimate Compound, which recommends a DA polisher for best results. Which If I do get one, would be what I'd more than likely use to finish it off before getting more compound. I'll have a look at those though.
     
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  4. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I'm sure others will chip (excuse the pun) in when they see your thread.

    If you've not used a DAS6 before, have a look at the videos on YT. That's what I did and it helped me.
     
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  5. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Cheers @Nels I've already been at the YT vids on how to use one,lol. It doesn't look that difficult to be hones, in fact it's probably alot easier than hand polishing and more consistent.
     
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  6. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    DAS 6 Seems pretty decent, had the pro version for a while without issue though admittedly it does not get hard usage.

    Some good vids on YT, always enjoy Junkman2000's tutorials.
    Out of interest he does mention the need to be indoors to use the meguiars (M105/205) products used in the tutorial vids, elsewhere he states that the polishes by Optimum are better formulated for outdoor use.
     
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  7. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Thanks very much for that. Although I have shade, I don't have the ability to go indoors.
     
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  8. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Hey no probs Harvey :Smile:
    Not really got to grips with trying a true correction polish, fixed the swirls on half my Dads bonnet for the experience, and some damage and marring on the current Civic.

    As for stuff for you to look out for, "Hexlogic" pads (work surface divided into hexagons) are pretty well thought of by many, a few orange cutting, and white finishing pads in large and small sizes with suitable backing pads will get you started okay.

    The polish mentioned above is not as common as other brands, but i'm told the consistency allows a better span of working time when outdoors. (Found it here: Detailed Obsession Not to everyone's taste apparently but Junkman always says technique not product is the key to success)

    Also making sure your paint is prepped and free of contaminants is a vital first step, but probably trying to teach you to suck eggs here already! haha!
     
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  9. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    I wouldn't say suck eggs mate, as it's always good to use newer or better ways of doing something.

    At the moment my usual washes consist of.

    Before even wetting the car.
    Ph neatral snow foam with a snowfoam lance.
    Rinse with karcher k2 pressure washer.
    Wash with Simoniz protection car wash using a clean wash mit and 1 bucket of water (I know I should use 2, but it's often Comandeered by a friend to wash his car at the same time, Saab 9-3 Aero.)
    Rinse with karcher k2.
    Dry using autoglym drying towel in straight motions, wringing out regularly.

    If and when I do polish the car.
    Hand applied autoglym super resin polish, with microfiber application pad.
    Buff off with clean microfibre towel.
    Wax with Meguirs carnauba wax with applicator pad.
    Buff off with clean microfibre towel.

    Wheels are cleaned using a wheel brush and separate wash mitt,
    Wheels are rinsed then left to dry on their own.
     
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  10. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Sounds like you have honed the routine bud :Smile: Still easy to spend hours though isn't it?! lol!

    Got one or two time saving methods to help keep things short but still sweet, most notably a funky little car/bike drying machine to blow 200 mph warm air over the car when drying (pretty pricey but it was a gift)

    Eggs are out again here, but before a machine polish correction really you would need to clay the paint on your chosen working area. A clay mitt or cloth is perhaps preferable to clay bar as Honda paint has a reputation for being quite soft and easy to mar, though the softness also means less work needed when polishing.
    Super resin polish does contain some fillers which fill the "swirls" masking some of the damage caused by every day wear and tear , so a good old cleanse will let you see what is what when you start to work, a good bright artificial light source can be a big help in assessing the job and gauging progress too.
     
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  11. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    @BB Baboonface, your right, Honda paint does seem to be rather soft, especially on my old girl, even with 140k on the clock. I'll have to look into claying the entire car first though before a DA session, as I bet I would be surprised at how much junk is still ground into the paint.

    As for the artificial light, isn't that big bright ball of fire in the sky no good, we don't see if often in Wales, nor do our Scottish cousins.

    Though I do have a 30w LED floodlamp that would more than likely do the job, just need to make or grab a tripod for it.
     
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  12. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Haha! It can be a rarity round these parts too it seems! :Smile:

    Floodlamp sounds like it may be a good call.
    Also agreed on the amount of contamination that shows up being surprising, given the Civic a full clay mitt sesh a few times and still get iron contamination spots showing up, more so due to the silver paint.
    Hopefully will get time to use the iron decon spray this spring, something to remove the pesky tar spots is also useful, had a bad experience with a hefty tar spot and a clay mitt once.

    Sorry to keep going on! As i'm sure you know already, detailing is a good way to empty a wallet fast! lol.
     
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  13. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Wouldn't iron contamination be a fancy way of saying rust?
     
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  14. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Sort of looks that way on a lighter colour, albeit in a very minor speckled fashion.
    I think it essentially stems from iron particles embedded in the clear coat layer of paint. Perhaps my issue comes from being situated relatively close to a railway line which has been cited as a source for such problems (Damn i type posh after a few drinks! lol!)
     
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  15. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Iron oxide is never a pleasant material to have embedded in clear coat by any stretch of the imagination. Though one assumes that the close approximation to said transportation link must mean that you are within the proverbial stones throw from said link.

    (No drinks where harmed during the making of this post, but they are about to be.... mmmmmmmm Fursty Ferret)
     
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  16. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Swallowed a few bishops fingers myself (hmmn sounds a bit wrong) big fan of the ferret though.

    Not too sure on the iron, maybe the previous owners were to blame.
    Either way the iron is not usually an issue for claying, tar on the other hand can be a pain.
     
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  17. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    perhaps the other thing is the possibility that quite abit of grinding or metal cutting went on with sparks flying, as I noticed I got a lot of rusty patches of oxide on the floor when I cut up some metal with a grinder a few weeks ago.

    I love the ferret, I think I tried bishops finger some time ago. One I am not that keen on is Spitfire, dunno why. Another good one from the Badgers Brewery is Tanglefoot, that's quite nice.
     
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  18. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Tanglefoot is another ale much quaffed by the old man and myself in recent times :Smile:

    Never considered the thought of metalworking being a cause, possibly all the work hacking off aged suspension components is to blame...
     
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  19. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    its a possibility, depends on if sparks flew. Suspension components are not so fun, a lot of the time.

    Ah good stuff, its nice ale. I also favour a good few ciders as well. Henry Westons special reserve (8.2%) along with koppaberg, bulmers and magners and some old mout.
     
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  20. BB Baboonface Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom James Chesterfield
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    Sparks definitely flew in more ways than one!

    Not really got into cider but may have to follow your recommendations there.
     
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