Suspension, Steering and Brakes FR-V front and rear brake pads

Discussion in '1st Generation (2004-2011)' started by mike787, Saturday 16th Mar, 2013.

  1. mike787 Banned ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Can anyone tell me if the method to replace the front and rear brake pads on the FR-V is the same as with the CR-V?
     
  2. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,177
    6,406
    516
    LOL at this rate you will be opening your own FR-V owners workshop !!

    dude slow down .JK
     
    Loading...
  3. mike787 Banned ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    :Smile: Hi IchibanAccord, there doesn’t seem to be much information around on the FR-V. I accept the cars are not being produced, but I understand they are in demand, so I want to look after mine while I have it and also this Owners Forum is probably the only source of information on the ’net for owners. With luck we can help as many owners and future owners as possible. I hope to be able to check the pads on mine in the next week or so. Just wondering if I need to source a device to wind back the brake calipers. If I recall correctly, my Civic brakes had to be wound back but I never had to do it. (I found that out before I had chance to cause any damage). In years gone by I have always been able to push the caliper back, to be able to fit new pads if required but I just want to be prepared! Owners workshop, I’m too old for that!
     
    Ichiban likes this.
  4. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,177
    6,406
    516
  5. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,177
    6,406
    516
    FR-V BE1 front and rear brake pads

    Safety First

    Use Torque wrench for all bolts on the braking system and wheel nuts.

    Jacking Points and Locations

    FRV Jacking Points 2.JPG FRV Jacking Points.JPG

    Front Brake Exploded Diagram
    FRV BE1 Front Brake Exploded.JPG

    Front Brake Pad Replacement

    Remove the front wheels.
    Remove the brake hose mounting bracket (A).
    Remove the flange bolt (B) while holding the pin (C) with a wrench being careful not to damage the pin boot, and pivot the caliper (D) up out of the way. Check the hose and pin boots for damage and deterioration.


    TOP TIP remove both bolts I won't leave one calliper bolt in as indicated. Don't round the bolts use a deep socket.


    FRV BE1 Front Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 1.JPG


    Remove the pad shims (A) and pads (B).


    FRV BE1 Front Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 2.JPG


    Remove the pad retainers (A).
    Clean the caliper bracket (B) thoroughly; remove any rust, and check for grooves and cracks.
    Check the brake disc for damage and cracks.
    Clean and install the pad retainers.


    FRV BE1 Front Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 3.JPG


    Apply Molykote M-77 paste to the brake pad side of inner pad shims (A), both sides of outer pad shim (B), the back of pads (C), and the other areas indicated by the arrows. Wipe excess paste off the shims and brake pads. Contaminated brake discs or pads reduce stopping ability. Keep paste off the brake discs and pads.
    Install the brake pads and pad shims correctly. Install the brake pad with the wear indicator (D) on the inside.
    If you are reusing the brake pads, always reinstall the brake pads in their original positions to prevent a momentary loss of braking efficiency.


    FRV BE1 Front Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 4.JPG
    Push in the piston (A) so that the caliper will fit over the pads. Make sure the piston boot is in position to prevent damaging it when pivoting the caliper down.
    Pivot the caliper (C) down into position. Install the flange bolt (D), and torque it to the specified torque while holding the pin B with a wrench being careful not to damage the pin boot.
    Install the brake hose mounting bracket.
    Press the brake pedal several times to make sure the brakes work.
    NOTE: Engagement of the brakes may require a greater pedal stroke immediately after the brake pads have been replaced as a set. Several applications of the brake pedal will restore the normal pedal stroke.
    After installation, check for leaks at hose and line joints or connections, and re-tighten if necessary.
    Install the front wheel, torque wheel nuts to 108 NM

    FRV BE1 Front Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 5.JPG
     
    Loading...
  6. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,177
    6,406
    516
    Rear Brake Exploded Diagram
    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Exploded.JPG

    Rear Brake Pad Replacement
    Remove the rear wheels.
    Release the parking brake.
    Remove the brake hose mounting bolt (A).
    Remove the flange bolts (B) while holding the pins (C) with a wrench being careful not to damage the pin boot, and remove the caliper (D). Check the hose and pin boots for damage and deterioration. Thoroughly clean the outside of the caliper to prevent dust and dirt from entering inside. Support the caliper with a piece of wire so it does not hang from the brake hose.


    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 1.JPG


    Remove the pad shims (A) and pads (B).


    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 2.JPG


    Remove the pad retainers (A).
    Clean the caliper bracket (B) thoroughly; remove any rust, and check for grooves and cracks.
    Check the brake disc/drum for damage and cracks.
    Clean and install the pad retainers.


    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 3.JPG


    Apply Molykote M-77 paste to the brake pad side of inner pad shims (A), both sides of outer pad shim (B), the back of pads (C), and the other areas indicated by the arrows. Wipe excess paste off the shims and brake pads. Contaminated brake discs or pads reduce stopping ability. Keep paste off the brake discs and pads.
    Install the brake pads and pad shims correctly. Install the brake pad with the wear indicator (D) on the inside.
    If you are reusing the brake pads, always reinstall the brake pads in their original positions to prevent a momentary loss of braking efficiency.
    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 4.JPG
    Push in the piston (A) so the caliper will fit over the pads. Make sure the piston boot is in position to prevent damaging it when installing the caliper.
    Install the brake caliper (B) and bolts (C), and torque it to the specified torque while holding the caliper pins (D) with a wrench being careful not to damage the pin boot.
    Install the brake hose mounting bolt (E).
    Press the brake pedal several times to make sure the brakes work.
    NOTE: Engagement of the brake may require a greater pedal stroke immediately after the brake pads have been replaced as a set. Several applications of the brake pedal will restore the normal pedal stroke.
    After installation, check for leaks at the hose and line joints or connections, and retighten if necessary.
    Install the rear wheel, then test-drive the vehicle.


    FRV BE1 Rear Brake Pad Replacement AOCUK 5.JPG

    So you don't need a wind back tool as such using a old brake pad with U clamp you cam push the rear caliper piston back in.
    Also follow the process to the letter don't take short cuts,looking forward your pictures.
     
    Loading...
  7. mike787 Banned ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks for the post IchibanAccord, at least I know I don’t have to buy a tool to wind back the calipers! Looks like it is how I did it in the past. I’ll just get the grease, looks as though ‘copperslip' is obsolete.
     
  8. DieselPower Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I've been using red rubber grease in other vehicles and it seems to work well.
     
    Loading...
  9. PurpleTurtle Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Steve
    19
    8
    Thanks for posting this, I am doing the pads on my wife's FR-V this week. It may also need front disks - does anybody have a step-by-step guide for disk replacement? Thanks in advance.
     
    Ichiban likes this.
  10. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
    14,999
    5,595
    4
    Loading...
  11. PurpleTurtle Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Steve
    19
    8
    Thanks SpeedyGee, looks fairly straighforward. I was just concerned about the two disc fixing screws, I see my dealer sells these alongside disks, just wanted to see how they fit into the big picture. All of that within my capabilities, should save a fair few quid!
     
  12. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    @PurpleTurtle, the two screws can be very tight, especially if the original discs are on.

    Do you have an impact driver ?
     
    Loading...
  13. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,177
    6,406
    516
    @PurpleTurtle a punch and hammer can get these screws off if you don't have a impact driver. It will not damage the cross head you have to have a knack of chasing it. These screws do tend to jam with water ingress and some come off easily and some are stubborn as hell.

    Best pratice is to change then with new ones just in case you damage the cross head , so you are not left stranded. Are you goinjg for Honda OEM or aftermarket brake parts?

    BTW welcome to HK
     
    Loading...
  14. PurpleTurtle Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Steve
    19
    8
    Thanks guys, appreciate the help. I do have an impact driver, annoyingly it is 100 miles away in a toolbox in my parents' garage, one of many I need to relocate! Ah well, you can never have too many tools, I'll pick one up locally.
    I am going for Honda OEM as they seem pretty reasonably priced.
     
  15. PurpleTurtle Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Steve
    19
    8
    Just to update, I've all sorted thanks ot the advice above, one very pleased missus at the amout saved, brownie points in the bag for me!

    Just a quick side issue: the clutch has also gone on our FR-V at 90k miles. I sourced a Honda OEM kit online at a good saving over RRP and had it fitted by a local indy garage, no complaints from me. However, on paying his (very reasonable) bill he said, "bit early for a clutch to go isn't it?". I thought 90k was pretty good, all considered. It's the 2.0 petrol model (am aware things can go awry earlier on 2.2 CDTis with DMFW). Is this a reasonable lifespan for an original clutch/third owner car/fair bit of town driving?
     
    Chunkylover53 likes this.
  16. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
    14,999
    5,595
    4
    It all depends on how the previous owner used (or perhaps abused) the car/clutch.

    90k isn't too bad going