Reviews Front skid plate CR-V 2004-2006

Discussion in 'Member's Reviews' started by Lionheart, Friday 29th Jul, 2016.

  1. Lionheart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Adrian Amersham
    17
    6
    I have seen this part:
    Manufacturer Part Number: 08P46-S9A-600A
    advertised, it appears to be a plastic part that fits under the front of the CR-V presumably to offer a degree of protection when off road.

    Has anyone any experience of it? How does it fit; does the engine pan need to be removed?

    I shall be taking my CR-V off road in September so am tempted but I don't want to buy a piece of useless bling.
     
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  2. Davej5 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Dave Cornwall
    141
    76
    I think being plastic they are more for show, also the way I read the listing you have to have the sport grill with it, they do not fit the standard bumper. I did find a company in Russia called Avtobronia that does a proper sump protection plate but that does not protect the bumper.
    - - - Updated - - -
    Sorry that name should be Avtobronja.
     
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  3. Pottermus Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    My dad has one on his Premiere. It doesn't really offer any substantial protection, it's more to add to the look
     
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  4. 1066Boy Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    For off road protection, Anything less than 6mm steel is not worth fitting.
    I found this the hard way after demolishing a aluminium one on my 4x4. :Devil:
     
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  5. Lionheart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Adrian Amersham
    17
    6
    Good advice all; I shall not be going for one.
    A shame really, I used to have a Discovery 300tdi which I fitted multiple plates to for steering and both diffs. I never had a problem over quite rough terrain (which the Honda won't be doing) but why doesn't anyone do some protection for these four wheel drives? I am sure the CV-R is more capable than it is given credit for; after all it must be at least as good as a Freelander 1 off road!
     
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  6. 1066Boy Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I will have a look through some of the company's that I know and see what I can find.
    Did you fit your new tyres?
     
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  7. Lionheart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Adrian Amersham
    17
    6
    Hello Allan
    Thanks for your offer to have a look through.

    Yes I have fitted the new tyres. I chose a relatively new one which comes well recommended by tyre reviews: Goodyear Wrangler A/T S/A which is an all-terrain, all-season tyre which is supposed to be good in the wet and slippery stuff. I chose the slightly taller size of 215/70/R16 100T. As you can see in the pictures they fill the wheel arches well and have a reasonably aggressive tread. I recon they have lifted the car by about an inch which should be useful considering the standard ground clearence. DSCF8686.JPG DSCF8687.JPG DSCF8690.JPG DSCF8692.JPG DSCF8696.JPG

    So how are they? I hear you cry. Well, first off, I was told they would be fine under the wheel arches and so far there has been no problem at all. There apears to be plenty of clearance all round and we still have full lock both ways without any rubbing. I haven't had her down on the bump stops yet but I think it is all going to be fine. Performance wise, you can feel a difference. The steering is definitely heavier although not troublingly so. Peculiarly though, it also feels a little more vague than with the Bridgestone Dualers. The ride is slightly more bumpy than before and, given the state of th the roads round here, this is not an advantage. There is a definite increase in road noise over the dualers a sort of singing at lower speeds but it is not too bad and I don't notice it anymore. I have not had the opportunity to really try them in the wet but the one time I did have to put the anchors on the car still pulled up quickly and true. There feels to be plenty of grip, I have been taking the bends and corners at a bit of a more leisurely pace as it feels as if that is what is required.

    They have been on the car a few weeks now and I am so used to them that I hardly notice the change. Being a taller tyre has of course changed the speedo reading. Previously the instument was reading 2mph fast i.e when the clock was showing 60 mph I was actualy doing 58. Now the speedo reads exactly right so at 60mph the car is going at 60. This was all measured against a sat nav and at different speeds from 30 to 70mph and at different locations so I am sure that the instrument is consistent throughout the range.

    So, well pleased with the tyres. It will be interesting to see how they are off the metalled road.

    The final picture shows an adaption I have made to the tow bar to provide a recovery point. Basically I have removed the cast iron bar from between the two tails coming off the bar itself and put a couple of high tensile bolts between the two with stainless steel tubes as spacers and for added strength.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Friday 12th Aug, 2016
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  8. Pottermus Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Where do you plan to take the car?
     
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  9. Lionheart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Adrian Amersham
    17
    6
    In September we are taking the car to the Auvergne where with friends we are going to drive the unmetalled roads/tracks for miles up into the hills/mountains, These tracks are the original roads used by the local people to get from village to village; many will be well over two hundred years old, are little used, but are still classified as roads. They have now been superseded by metalled roads. We have done this before in a 300tdi Discovery so know the type of terrain. We are not going to do the most challenging tracks, but those I suppose in the UK we would class as green lanes. There will be climbs, washouts and ruts but no deep wading or mud and no rock climbing.

    Picture 032. Picture 052. Picture 072. Picture 073.

    From a previous visit: - The first two pictures show the type of track the second is a washout. Third some of the scenery and the last one the type of village served by the tracks.

    Fingers crossed, the CR-V will get through!
     
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  10. Pottermus Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    hmm, I don't doubt the CR-Vs ability on terrain like in the picture above but like you, I would be concerned about underside damage on some of them rocks etc.
     
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  11. 1066Boy Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I think your tyres will be just the job for the trip looking at the photos.
    My idea would of been Yokohama Geolandas but performance wize the
    is nothing in it. Have had a look at my normal places for your underbody
    protection and no joy. Only people I could find was in Australia.
    Just go slow and pick your line carefully and you will be fine. :Thumbup:
    - - - Updated - - -
    Just another thought, your recovery point at the rear. I would use a recovery strap
    with a closed loop each end and a shackle. Offroad, tow ropes with hooks on the
    end tend to snap and can launch the hook like a missile. Hope I am not stating
    the obvious, just would not like to see you do any damage.
     
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  12. Lionheart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Adrian Amersham
    17
    6
    Hi again
    Thanks for the thoughts on the towing out. I have indeed got a long strop with close ends and a shackle or two for towing out backwards. For the front I have a strop with hooks at both ends which fit the two towing points perfectly to spread the weight and get a straight pull. We will not be using the snatch type ropes. Hope I don't need to use any of it.

    I can do some pictures if it is of interest.
     
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