Fuel Efficiency Fuel Consumption

Discussion in '2nd Generation (2002-2006)' started by Davidaccord, Wednesday 17th Dec, 2014.

  1. Davidaccord Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I'd be grateful for some input on what fuel consumption I should expect from my 2002 petrol CR-V. Currently getting (max) 200 miles / tank around town and 250 on motorways (spec says 58 ltr tank, but I've never got more than 50 ltrs in even when on fumes). Usable range closer to 45 - 50 ltr I reckon which equates to 18 - 22mpg which is surely less than should be expected? Had diagnostics check which pointed to two faulty sensors in gearbox, but was told these won't effect fuel consumption and cost to inspect/replace very high. Checked for binding brakes and type pressures OK. Your comments & suggestions appreciated
     
  2. Mark Whitfield Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mark UK
    55
    15
    I've heard 22 is about average. A lot depends on driving style and worth checking your air filter too.
     
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  3. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,134
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    Do you run on supermarket fuel or normal grade fuel from major oil companies? I would say Supermarket fuel are the worst for MPG and you will be off easily by 20 %.

    I would go and add further if any petrol car has done 100K miles\ 10 years old you should ideally change the 02 sensor before the cat as the sensor is now degraded and will give erroneous reading as it past its serviceable life. You don't have to change the o2 sensor only when you see the MIL on the dash.:Wink:
     
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  4. Mark Whitfield Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mark UK
    55
    15
    Hopefully that doesn't apply to diesel too?
     
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  5. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
    30,134
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    Supermarket diesel is cack too much bio stuff not enough crude oil content.
     
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  6. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,977
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    Aye, and if the EU has it's way the percentage will only drop to less and less actual diesel. It's no wonder so many cars get bunged up and hurt on the stuff.
     
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  7. Lango Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Lango
    37
    16
    Hi David. I have on 06 petrol auto. 22 seems very low unless you are doing short journeys/cols starts/all town mileage. I get around 30 depending on usage. Winter really seems to knock it down as does windy weather! Must be the brick like aerodynamics. On a summers day on a motorway 1 up 34 is possible on a good trip. Check the rear brakes as they can seize. (Try pushing iton the flat)
     
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  8. excel monkey Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Epsom
    119
    45
    Bit low, but not disastrous. When was the car last serviced? I have a 2004 manual petrol, and can get 28-30 MPG on a long run if I take it steady (the aerodynamics of the car mean that there is a big diff between driving at 70mph and 85mph). Average over two years of ownership is 24mpg.
     
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  9. djberney Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I've not had mine long ('02 petrol, 138k, manual) and I seem to be getting around 25mpg. Not had it serviced yet so it might improve. Got to get used to driving it too. With my last car it had a MPG read on the dash, and though it might not be 100% it did give some idea of where you were losing it.
     
  10. ourmark Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mark Otley
    29
    9
    I'm getting 26.7mpg on commuting and weekend shopping trips.

    I've had 33.6mpg on a longer drive, but that was with a fair bit of congestion and also before I'd got the car's servicing and brakes up to date so I think I can do better.

    I keep the tyres slightly on the firm side at 36psi which I think helps.
     
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  11. Eureka Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Paul Lancaster
    86
    33
    I've only had my CR-V a few weeks and I am only on my second tank full of fuel.
    First tank full according to the computer was averaging 19mpg. Apart from when I brought the car home on the motorway that was 90% around town and with all the road modifications and road works locally it was all I expected. (220miles on the 1st tank)
    So far on my second tank full it is showing as 17-18mpg on the computer but that also is 100% in town and a lot of waiting at roadworks due to a major road development that's taking place locally and expected to continue for the next year or maybe two.

    Its a little less than I expected but not by a lot considering my last car in similar conditions and traffic was only managing 26mpg average (merc 2.5 turbo diesel).

    Taking a short trip on a free running road/a road and the average increases quite quickly. When I bought the car its average on the computer was 19.5mpg so pretty much knew what to expect as traffic was flowing a lot better where the car came from to where I live.

    I will be able to compare the computer average to my usual system of fill to refill and see how accurate the computer is.
     
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  12. ourmark Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mark Otley
    29
    9
    26.8mpg on the last tank of commuting / weekend driving. Very similar to before.

    34.3mpg on motorway driving in windy conditions (not a tail-wind, sadly!)

    I'm determined to crack 35!
     
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  13. Chrispike Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Is this thread true? I've been looking at a petrol one, but can't be doing with under 20mpg!

    I get 47 in my 2.2 diesel accord, parkers claim 51, so im not going to get more than 25 am I!

    Its a diesel one or back to the drawing board then!
     
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  14. jd1959 Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Ireland Zack Kilkenny
    367
    180
    One problem I've had on a couple different cars including my first gen CR-V was a thermostat starting to fail or the rubber not sealing well. The engine would be a bit slow to warm and it wouldn't allow the torque converter to lock up at speed as quickly, thus using more fuel for that bit longer. Once replaced it helped a bit with the fuel economy. Just something to throw out there from personal experience once auto cars hit around the 10yr mark.
     
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  15. John Dickson Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Sounds like it may just need a good few tankfulls of Shell V-Power Nitro+ (VPN) or BP Ultimate (BPU). It will take a few to allow for the additives in these two fuels to take full effect. If the car has had years of supermarket fuel then this very, very poor quality fuel, which does not have any beneficial additives in, will have led to a build up of contaminants in the engine and fuel lines.

    Shell VPN and BPU have good quality detergents in both of them that can remove these contaminants and deposits but the snag is the longer the build up has gone on, the longer it takes for VPN or BPU to clean them out.

    BPU is perhaps better than VPN in some ways as it is the only fuel that is 100% crude oil derived.

    Also there is a lot to be said fro the "Italian Tune Up". First get the whole car up to operating temperature - this means diffs, gearbox etc. as well as the engine. People often overlook the rest and just get the engine warm. 5 miles and it will be fully warmed up. Then just give it a good work out over the full engine rev range and this will help clean it out.

    Don't do it when cold though as this is bad for the engine, gearbox etc.

    All supermarket fuel is rubbish and will cause problems eventually. Diesel is perhaps the worst as, not only will you suffer the extra financial burden of poorer fuel economy, you will also vastly shorten the life of your fuel pump, injectors and DPF if your vehicle has one. That is a hidden expense of £1000s. Really blows the "saving" of using supermarket fuel out of the window.

    I know of an Audi Q7 that cost the second owner £3,000 due to the previous owner using only supermarket fuel which turned the whole fuel system into a grey, metallic sludge. Yes there is the Audi versus Honda quality debate here; a Honda should never suffer this badly but that illustrates the potential of the issues that could occur.

    Now the common argument against this I get at work is "But the fuel all comes from the same place. I've seen Morrison's Tankers leaving the Shell Terminal at Jarrow before so how would it not all be the same?"

    Before supermarket fuel was available the same refineries produced fuel that was not all the same - 2 Star, 3 Star, 4 Star and Diesel and Red Diesel never mind heating oil, LPG etc so it shows it is relatively easy to segregate and grade different standards and qualities of fuel at the one fuel terminal.

    I don't even run my Izy on supermarket fuel.
     
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  16. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    I must say, a car is one of those "You get what you pay for", it really is. Sure, you can cut corners, but in doing so, you either risk your safety, the safety of your kids/wife/loved ones/other road users, or you pay in the long run for unreliability issues due to cutting corners.

    My Accord hasnt touched supermarket fuel except in emergencies, and even then, its just enough to get us to a proper garage. The Civic has only used Shell since she has been in our ownership (admittedly, still on the same tank that I put in her), but she will only use proper fuel as well.

    Supermarket stuff is rubbish, don't touch it or else, as @John Dickson alludes to above, you run the risk of potentially suffering really expensive bills. Cheap fuel compared to proper fuel will cost what? A few quid extra per tank? Worth it to me, more performance, better economy and it lubricates your pump, injectors etc correctly.
     
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  17. John Dickson Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Another two-penneth's worth I'll throw into the ring is don't believe diesel is always economical motoring and petrol is not.

    I have had 5 Accords. 2.0 petrols and 2.2 diesels all maunals. For example, quoted combined cycle figures by Honda (2013 Accord brochure) are as follows:

    2.0iVTEC EX - Combined Cycle: 40.4MPG
    2.2 I-DTEC EX - Combined Cycle: 52.3MPG

    Now on my usual daily driving which has remained largely the same I get the two following real world MPGS

    Petrol 33-34MPG
    Diesel 37-38MPG

    On motorway runs

    Petrol 44-45MPG
    Diesel 52-54MPG

    This clearly states how petrol is the more economical option. Petrol gets much closer to Combined Cycle figures across the board than diesel ever has (or probably will)

    Round the doors driving then petrol wins again as despite the slightly higher figures of diesel, petrol works out more cost effective as it is a significantly cheaper fuel, the vehicle is cheaper to buy by a large margin and whole life running costs are lower for a petrol vehicle.

    Yes a diesel may offer a better return when hammering in the motorway miles but just think about the motorway miles you'd have to do to reap the economy benefits and then weigh this up against the extra miles effect on depreciation.
     
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  18. Chrispike Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Differences between CR-V and accord? People are reporting 20-25mpg.

    I get 46-48 out of my accord. I need to fill up about once a month. Doing 20 MPG, id have to fill up once a every 10 days. (based on 8 20 mile commutes to work (5 from me and 3 from wife) so £60 on fuel (DERV) or £180 (perv)

    Not to mention the fact that the MPG in my accord goes down by at least 5 MPG when the wife drives it.
     
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  19. John Dickson Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    @Chrispike that is good economy.

    Yes 8th Generation is a bit heavier but not by that much to give such a difference.
     
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  20. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    My other half does the same @Chrispike and she insists that she isnt heavy footed :Whistle:

    Bear in mind, economy as quoted by the manufacturers is never accurate, those tests are conduted without wind resistance or road friction, low revs over short "distances" whilst the engine is plugged into a machine.

    can't comment on the CR-V economy, but I would imagine that as its a bigger car, more weight to drag around and depending on how its been looked after, it may very well be more to run than your Accord. Have you see or driven any yet?

    Around town, I get mid to late 40s out of the accord, on long trips, I easily hit late 50s
     
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