Body, Paint & Styling Help Please on Spray Painting Tailgate Trim

Discussion in '7th Generation (2001-2005)' started by RogerH69, Monday 23rd Mar, 2015.

  1. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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    I'm wanting to spray the chrome trim on my tailgate to match the colour of my car (colour code is apparently NH-674M - though I will confirm this). As I've never sprayed anything before, I was wondering -
    1. How would I need to prepare the trim piece ?
    2. Would I need primer before the paint ? If so, would it be any particular primer, or would basic Halfords grey primer be Ok ?
    3. Where is the best place to get the correct colour paint in an aerosol can ?
    4. Once it's sprayed, and dried, do I need to treat it with anything else ?
    As I said, I've never done this before, hence what may seem like noob questions, but I'd like to give it a go myself, and I think it's something I could do on my own.
     
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  2. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    There are some clips on you tube. These were the first two I found.



    As for paint suppliers, try searching for 'car paint suppliers in xxxxx'. Look for the places that supply the trade. They can make you a can of your colour. You just need to quote the paint code. (I paid about £10ish for a can)
    They should also be able to supply you with primer, lacquer, wet and dry and anything else you need. Just remember that it's all about preparation. If you've not used rattle cans before, get a cheap one and practice on something else first. It takes a little practice if you want to avoid orange peel or runs.

    I have found my independent has far better quality paints than anything Halfords or similar sell. Hope that helps.
     
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  3. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Our Rich is a expert on paint @Nighthawk sort out Rog fella when you have a mo.
     
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  4. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Will do, Rog il make a proper post tomorrow for you and hope it will be of some assistance
     
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  5. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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  6. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    wouldn't say im an expert in the slightest but i have tinkered around with a bit of painting before
     
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  7. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Well you know your thinner, primers basecoat and best practices that more than a simple foundation course or reading the Which magazine.
     
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  8. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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  9. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    @RogerH69 - just got home mate, give me an hour or so and I will respond properly to this post (kids still up)
     
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  10. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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    No rush mate. Thanks
     
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  11. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Firstly, sorry Rog, this completely slipped my mind :blush::judge:

    Respraying your trim is an OK job, really easy to get it very wrong though so you do need to be careful but I will try to cover as much as I can here. don't mean to scare you off doing it, its not a hard job, just takes patience. I remember taking @DeviateDefiant through it on his grill and it only really sunk in when he actually saw me doing it myself so its one of those things that you really do learn more by doing it yourself.

    Firstly, this is about spraying a plastic piece of trim, its obviously not real chrome and has just been painted to make it look like it is. This makes life so much easier and painting and preparing real chrome is an absolute nightmare. Basically, all you are wanting to do here in this situation is to rough up the surface to provide a key for the primer and top coat to adhere

    You need to make sure you remove every single trace of oil, grease, muck etc off the surface. Painting is one of those - preparation is the key to a good job. Any imperfections will be magnified hugely when painted as the paint is so thin and reflective that it will stand out from a mile away.

    - Remove the trim (obviously) and give it a really good clean with a wax and grease cleaner, I used this on my alloys (Pre-Clean [40-00-30] - £5.00 : Wheel Paints I would also recommend latex gloves as the oil from your hands can affect the paint adhesion as you handle the trim.
    - Now, this next part depends largely on whether or not the trim has any damage on it. I will assume here that there is NO damage in anyway to it. Grab some 200-600ish wet and dry sandpaper and start rubbing down the chrome paint. All you are wanting to do is to remove ALL the shinyness from it so it looks very dull and full of minor scratches. This is known as "keying" and the minute scratches provide a foundation for the new paint to adhere to. If you happen to break through the paint onto the actually plastic below, its not a huge issue, but then involves an extra step to correct it. Try to keep the scratches as minor as possible (don't use too coarse paper) as again, this will show in the final work. Start with the coarsest paper first (200) and work your way up to 600. The purpose is for you to remove the scratches made by the previous sandpaper, so 400 removes 200, and 600 removes the scratches caused by 400 etc.
    - IF you break through (quite possible), you will need to use plastic primer to prevent the plastic from absorbing the paint. This is available in spray can format. Spray the areas that you have broken through and allow it to dry fully
    - If you don't break through, or have done the above step, then you need to prime the trim. The colour of primer depends on the colour that you are painting your trim, so light colours need a light primer and dark colours need a dark primer. I would use grey on your car. You get two main types of primer, etch and normal. Etch contains a formula which bulks it up a bit and fills any scratches made by the sandpaper. This is a good choice for a first timer, however it thickens out the job a bit. Not a huge issue, I used etch primer on my alloys, and then normal afterwards.

    I would use normal primer on yours if there is no damage and has been no repairs as the scratches should be all gone by the time you have rubbed it down with 600. Any 1k primer will surfice for this, including the Halfords stuff. This however, is where I would leave the Halfords stuff well alone and move onto proper equipment. Their paint is not the best, and their lacquer is horrific.

    - So, prime the trim, rub it down first with some pre clean to remove all residue of the water from the sandpaper and any oil/lint etc, its a small piece so it should be quite easy to spray evenly. Spraying is the hard part, and without sounding arrogant, it is an absolute art within itself. I learnt using proper air spray guns in a professional booth with a professional showing me what to do which was an absolute blessing. @DeviateDefiant will confirm that each time we opened a new can, we had to do test sprays as each can has a different spray pattern, whereas a gun, you set it to how you want the pattern to be. So, you never want the can to fall over a 50 degree angle (keep it as vertical as you reasonable can) as it will start sputtering on you and make an absolute mess of your work in every way. A simple rule here is this, the closer the can is to the trim, the faster you need to move it, the further away it is, the slower you move it. This speed is soemthing you will just have to teach yourself at the time as each can is different. If it were me, I would position the can at a distance where the nozzle covers the entire width of the trim so that the pattern stays even. Primer isnt too bad as if you get it wrong, you can just rub it back and try again, but any imperfections here WILL show in the final job. I am right handed, so start spraying left to right with just a few passes, ensuring that you cover the entire trim that you are painting. Tape up the underside (the paint will get under there unless you do so). The primer you are only wanting to cover the piece evenly. The first coat needs to be what is called a Tack coat. This is where it is a light spray, which bonds to the pre prepared surface and provides a firmer base for the second, and heavier/thicker coat to adhere to. Primer dries pretty quickly (couple of minutes normally) as it doesnt need to flash off (dry) as quickly as the base coat (colour) does. Once the Tack coat is dry, spray again, keeping it at a steady speed, moving left to right (for me being right handed, opposite direction if you arent), this time a bit heavier. Wait for this to dry, make sure there are no runs and then do a third coat. If you get any runs, you will have to wait for it to dry fully and then sand it back so it is totally smooth to the touch, no ridges, bumps, nicks etc. Normally touch dry within minutes, 30 minutes or so for it to be dry enough to be sanded back. On a small piece like this, you can sand it down by moulding the sandpaper to your hand. Always sand in the same direction at this stage

    - Once this is done, its time for the base coat to be applied, again, rub it down with pre clean. @DeviateDefiant used an online company to get his paint mixed up (the one can sprayed beautifully, the second one was not so nice), so I cannot remember which company he used but there are quite a few that can mix up the correct colour for you according to your colour code. Start spraying with the same technique as above, however this time, start the spray before the paint hits the trim - so start spraying a few inches further left of the trim and whilst its spraying, then move it left to right across the trim and keep it spraying as you leave the right end of the trim and go another inch or so. Sounds wasteful, but if you activate the spray directly onto the trim, it will splutter initially due to the air pressure and throw blobs of paint around. Again, tack coat, and wait for it to flash off. There are thinners within the paint which is what makes it appear to have a glossy look. This has to evaporate. If you rush it, the thinners in the paint which has not evaporated will cause the paint to bubble as you put layers on top of it. So, Tack coat, flash off, a thicker coat, but not too thick that it runs (you HAVE to manage the speed here - I cannot stress how important this is). If you get this part wrong, you will have to rub back to primer and start again. Do three coats in total, including tack coat and allow it to dry. It should start looking good now. The colour will be slightly off if you hold it up to your car but this is due to it not having any lacquer on it which deepens the base coat. Once this is dry, its time for the lacquer. DO NOT sand the base coat to make it smooth, the lacquer will do that job for you.

    - Lacquer - this is the hardest part. If you get this wrong, you will have to restart from the very beginning. Only use 2k lacquer- this is a much higher quality lacquerthan anything you can get from Halfords who stock 1k normally. 2k lacquer is horrific for your lungs, you need to wear a mask. Here is where there is a slight logistical problem, you need to be in a well ventilated area to use it as it will wreck your lungs, but you don't want the trim to be exposed to debris from wind coming through. @DeviateDefiant and I just held our breath, did a quick pass, and went back outside again for 5 minutes, and then repeated the process :Laughing:. Give it a test spray on something unrelated so you can see the spray pattern, do a pass as well as a test to see how evenly the lacquer falls and adjust your speed accordingly. Lacquer runs pretty easily so be careful. Prepare the can (normally you have to mix the ingredients together), and then start spraying, same technique as the colour, This time, start an inch or so from the left as mentioned above, but sweep the can in from an angle and then sweep it away again once you have left the other side of the trim. Hard to explain, but you want the particles to fall evenly and not concentrated in one place. Lacquer takes around 10-15 mins to flash off and is not always immediately obvious that it has, unlike the base coat which loses its glossy look. So, tack coat again as before, a light covering to prepare the surface, you want it to flash off (thinners evaporate), but not dry (there is a difference) and then go with a slightly thicker/heavier coat. Do three or four coats. This is likely to take a couple of hours. If you rush it and do not allow the lacquer to flash off, the chemical process of it drying will push up the layer of lacquer you have sprayed above it to peel and come away making it look awful.

    I used this lacquer on my alloys 2K Clearcoat Aerosol [NO CODE] - £12.99 : Wheel Paints
    @DeviateDefiant used another type, which was fine as well.

    Once the lacquer is fully dried (2-3 days!! depending on temperature), you can then rub it back gently with some 1200 grit wet and dry and then buff it up. It SHOULD then match the car nicely.

    I think thats about it, quite hard to explain it properly. If you want a hand mate, let me know, you arent far from me, we can make a day of it and I can show you what I mean and let you do it rather than me try to explain it on here.

    Accord/6th Generation - Defiant's Accord Type-R - Latest: O2 Sensors, Odd n' Sods | Page 10

    Shows how I did DD's chrome grill.

    Oh yes, as an afterthought, make sure the trim is not cold and that the cans are warm as well, helps the paint/lacquer spray more evenly and the warm trim helps it adhere, prevent runs etc.
     
    Last edited: Tuesday 31st Mar, 2015
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  12. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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    Thanks @Nighthawk . That's a serious wall of text :Smile:

    Lots of detail in there. Much appreciated
     
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  13. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    As mentioned mate, if you want a hand, let me know and we can meet up, you can do all the work, Il just guide you through it if you want it.
     
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  14. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Great explanation @Nighthawk. As you say, spraying is an art in itself. :Thumbup:
     
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  15. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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    Thanks mate. I'll let you know if I wanna do this and I'll bring the biltong and Castle lager :Drinks:
     
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  16. RogerH69 Premium Member Club Supporter

    South Africa Roger Oxford, UK
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    @Nighthawk , I'm checking to see if I can find some used tailgate trims from yards breaking the same model Civic, and if I get some cheap enough, I think I'll do the spray (taking you up on your offer of 'apprenticeship') on one of those (means I also don;t have 2 holes in the trim from my old reverse camera). If I get more than one replacement trim piece, I may use some plasti dip spray as well to see how it looks, or maybe some black (or red :Smile: ) carbon wrap.

    I actually saw 2 places breaking Crystal Pearl Grey EP3s, which has the trim piece already colour coded with the car, but they seem to be slightly different (and have a hole for the tailgate lock)