Electrical & Lights I'm no expert, but here's what I think.

Discussion in '7th Generation (2003-2008) [Acura TSX]' started by smiler, Wednesday 22nd Jan, 2014.

  1. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hey people, :Wave:

    I only joined up this week and while trying not to seem arrogant or big-headed, I'd like to ask for advice already.

    There are many questions I'd like to ask, but I would like to start with something that involves messing about with electrical and ignition systems.

    I recently purchased a voltmeter and necessary bits for mounting and installation. Now I admit that I'm no expert (although I'd like to be), but I personally don't see a problem with wiring the positive wire from the voltmeter, straight to the battery via a suitable switch. There are probably plenty of reasons why it shouldn't be done that way, so if anyone can offer any then I'd be very grateful for the assistance.

    :Wink:
     
    Last edited: Wednesday 22nd Jan, 2014
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  2. RobB Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Nothing wrong with your approach mate.
     
  3. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks RobB. So assuming it's completely safe to go ahead with that, what's the easiest or safest way to feed a wire through the bulkhead? It's probably going to be a pain-in-the-ass job that requires removal of the dashboard, right? Also, would anyone know if there's a suitable mounting point for the ground/negative wire, maybe under the dash or somewhere similarly accessible?
     
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  4. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
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    Follow one of the wiring harnesses from the engine bay into the cabin. You may have to remove some dash board trim to find the wiring but you won't have to remove much. The ground/ negative can be attached to anywhere on the dashboard mounting frame.
     
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  5. candobill Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    I can see what you are about but one thing I would do is make sure that you have an in line fuse for the voltmeter in case of any problems the fuse could save a lot of damage :Thumbup:
     
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  6. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    The gauge came with a fuse holder (containing a suitable fuse) as an integral part of the positive wire, so that shouldn't be an issue. Thanks people, I appreciate the advice. :Thumbup:
     
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  7. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I don't suppose anyone has ever played with ignition wires on a '53 Accord? Once I finally figure out how to remove the ignition barrel, I need to find the positive ignition wire. Does anyone know which wire that would be?

    - - - Updated - - -

    ...and how to actually get to the wires? :Unknown:
     
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  8. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    Hi Smiler,
    What do you want to do with the ignition.
    'Ignition barrel'=distributor, yes?
     
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  9. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi there I-DSI,

    If you've read the earlier posts here, you'll probably have realised that I'm trying to figure out how to install a voltmeter into my '53 Accord. Originally, I planned on using a switch, but I reckon I could save a whole lot of messing about with trying to feed wires through the bulkhead if I were to splice into the ignition. May also lower the risk of the wire overheating...? I'm a total noob when it comes to auto-electrics. :Unknown:

    Ignition barrel = distributor... I'm honestly not sure. By ignition barrel, I meant the slot into which the key is inserted to start the engine. May or may not be the same thing. Sorry I can't be more definitive. :Blushing:
     
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  10. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    No they are two different things. Ignition barrel is on the steering column, its what you put your key into.
     
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  11. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    :Sobbing: It's times like these when I really wish I'd had the chance to learn about cars in my earlier years.

    So, we're talking about the ignition barrel then, thanks SpeedyGee. Is there a simple way to remove it? I appreciate the help so far, thanks people :Hey:
     
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  12. Phil1978 Top Contributor ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆

    Phil Salisbury
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    Usually when an ignition feed is needed for an auxiliary device people get the feed from the fuse box and use a piggyback fuse holder like in this guide for a dash cam fitment.

    http://hondakarma.com/threads/9029/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sunday 23rd Feb, 2014
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  13. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks Phil1978. :Thumbup: Ok. so now I know how to do that, here's my next question:

    I've been thinking about this for several months. It may seem utterly ridiculous and stupid to most people, but does anyone know how much work would be involved in swapping a C32B engine from an NSX into a CL7 Accord? That's assuming I can actually find a C32B... :Blushing:
     
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  14. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    Why the C32B engine ? I can't recall ever seeing that swap. The K Series has so much potential for improvement
     
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    DeviateDefiant likes this.
  15. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
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    Forced induction can take you to 700hp, but that's just too much for a FWD car anyway.

    Furthermore, if it's the power you're after, the J-Series replaced the C-Series. They have more power stock, are still produced, have bolt-ons more readily available, and most importantly there's at least a few J-Swaps to read up about online. I can tell you, having been researching the best course to power in the 7th Generation for a long time, it's not the way to get more power out of your car.

    For far less money you could build a V6 killer out of a K-Series.
     
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  16. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks again for the advice people.

    I was considering a C32B swap just because it would be something unique, plus the power gains from the 3.2 V6. I have also considered the J series (J37A4, J35Y1, J35Y2), but i preferred the twin cam C series over the single cam J series. This is because J37A4 only makes 15bhp more than C32B, and as C32B is twin cam, I thought that it would provide more potential than the single cam J37A4? :Unknown:

    I currently have a 2 litre K20A6 and have been also considering the following options: H22A from Type-R Accord/Prelude, and K24A2. Maybe even, dare I say it, twin engine conversion? I know it may not be worth it when considering the amount of work required and extra weight from a second engine.

    I'm basically trying to find the best way to get as near perfectly balanced as possible between usable power and reliability in the Accord. Once again, I really appreciate the advice. AOC stickers also arrived in the post, thanks very much! :Happy:
     
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  17. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
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    I'll be blunt, any V6 engine swap into a CL7 hasn't been done for a reason. Utilising anything 300bhp+ at the wheels for a FWD car is already a challenge in itself. If you want to build the most insanely powered 7th Generation Accord the world's ever seen, the lowest spec CL7 packing a K20A6 is not the right base. The only 7th that could truly utilise a V6 engine would be the AWD CL8 (or CM3 wagon), and that's not even found this side of the world. I mean, engine management, unless you're seriously skilled yourself would be damn near impossible. Don't forget, K-Series engines are mounted the other way to C/J for a start, the amount of custom fabrication that would be needed is insane. We're talking about custom making more parts than you'd even be able to keep.

    With the CL9 we at least have Hondata FlashPro, we can get LSD from the Euro-R or one of the K-Series Type-Rs, we have tons of cam, piston, injector, intake, throttle, exhaust options etc. You can take a K-Series engine to sky-high numbers with forced induction, I just don't see why you'd want to spend 5x the money trying to get a V6 solution to work.

    You're along the right lines with a K24A2, except it's actually identical to the K24A3 found in our Accord CL9s already. You could go the long way around and build up the lowest grade 7th Generation with a K24 and tons of borrowed parts from a CL9, or you could just buy an early CL9 for £2k :Whistle:
     
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  18. smiler Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks DD, I appreciate your honesty. :Thumbup: I intend to keep my CL7 for sentimental reasons, but I do understand that it's not a fantastic base car for serious power.

    Whatever I end up doing, I'm pretty certain it won't be quite as extreme as this: INSANE 2 STEP & Test Passes Drag Hondas - YouTube


    I'll figure something out... ... watch this space :Blink:
     
    Last edited: Wednesday 12th Feb, 2014
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  19. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
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    Well nothing stops you grabbing another Accord as a project car. Look forward to seeing what you come up with :Smile:
     
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  20. PeteMM Premium Member Club Supporter

    Northern Ireland Pete Belfast, UK
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    I really don;t see any reason why a CL isn't a good base car.

    Horses for courses and all that.

    It wasn't 10 years ago people were saying our MG Midgets needed a 1380cc with circa 100hp to be competitive, technology has allowed us to run 150+HP 1496cc engines based off the same 1275cc block. Moving on from that, there are a lot of 200+HP K-Series engined Midgets and now there is at least 2 S2000 engined ones about aswell.

    If a B18c can be made to fit in the front of a Mini Clubman, a compact V6 can go in the accord, afterall, the 6th Generation coupe came in V6 form, so there may well be off the shelf items to help you.

    As a serial car modifier (motorsport, not McDonalds drive-thru crap) I tend to go down the lines of anything is possible given the budget to do it right. Whether it is economically viable is another matter altogether, but I certainly wouldn't be put off from trying if you have the time, the car and even the slightest clue on how to operate a welder. Paying someone else to do the conversion would of course render the project sooo expensive that only really stupid people would go ahead with it.
     
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