Fuel Efficiency Is there diesel and diesel?

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by mikey77, Thursday 6th Jun, 2013.

  1. mikey77 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I'm still getting used to my 2010 diesel automatic, which means watching the fuel computer rather more closely than I would otherwise. I've owned more than 50 motors but this is my first diesel.
    When I bought the car I asked the Honda dealer whether I should use a particular brand of diesel and he said no. Since then I've done 7000km, mostly on diesel from my local supermarket (they have the market in France, rather than branded filling stations and I've never had any trouble with any of their petrol - unlike supermarket petrol in the UK). Fuel consumption has been very acceptable but I find the engine noisy and rough between 1500-2000 RPM. I had heard this could be a problem but my car shows no outstanding recalls for re-mapping according to Honda Europe.
    Anyway, I did a long trip over the last few days and after a couple of hundred kms I filled the car with diesel from the Super U supermarket, because I was passing it.
    What a transformation! The engine is quieter, smoother AND consumption has nosedived by the equivalent of about 6mpg. I noticed on the pump nozzle there was something about 'diesel with additive' but I didn't take any notice at the time. Since then I've filled at Super U twice more and the good news continues.
    So, can a different brand of diesel make such a huge difference to a particular engine? And, so I don't have to keep finding Super Us, can I buy this 'additive' stuff and put it in myself?
     
  2. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
    1,046
    300
    1
    Hi Mikey,
    I'm not that familiar with dieselfuel. But I do know for sure that you can NOT put any additive in the fuel of your car.
    It's indeed possible that there's a difference between 2 brands, but I have never experienced a difference (not by car, not by motorcycle) myself. Anyhow, watch the price at the pump if you have lower consumption with a certain brand. It might be more expensive or equal in the end.
     
    Loading...
  3. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Just been to France and ran my I-CTDI on Carrefour and E.Leclerc diesel at 1.30euro a litre blooming cheap never noticed any difference in sound or performance though maybe get in touch with Super U and ask them?
     
    Loading...
  4. Julianp Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Paris
    55
    2
    Generally in France you can buy two kinds of diesel, the standard type and what is referred to as Premium, Plus or Excellium depending on the brand, and which costs a few centimes more per litre. There have been regular press features here on whether it's worth paying the extra. The most common view seems to be that the premium diesels will not give you any better fuel consumption or performance, but that the additives (which are included in the fuel, you don't add them yourself, I-DSI) do tend to keep the engine cleaner and reduce the build-up of soot and impurities in the engine. The other point often made is that it makes good sense to buy fuel (whether petrol or diesel) from a filling station which has a high turnover so that you don't end up buying fuel which has been around for a long time or may have picked up impurities from the bottom of their tank. The supermarket chains are generally supplied by the big fuel companies anyway and given their high turnover they are often good places to use. For my part - and I m on my first diesel too - I use the premium diesel whenever I can and have had no issues in my first 11,000 miles.
    Julian.
     
  5. mikey77 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks for that. I think I'll experiment with a few brands, including the Total Excellium and see how it goes.
    It's a shame Elf stations seem to have vanished from the south west - their fuels always seemed superior but at supermarket prices. Strange really, because Total and Elf are the same firm...
     
  6. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
    1,046
    300
    1
    Bonjour Julian,
    Sure, you don't put them in yourself. But Mikey asked in his first post : "can I buy this 'additive' stuff and put it in myself?", and I replied: 'no, you can NOT put in additives yourself.'.
    I believe you misunderstood?
     
    Loading...
  7. Robbie Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Robert Lancashire
    450
    91
    Different diesels do make a difference. I have moved from Tesco supermarket diesel to Shell V-Power as I believe it is a better fuel. I have just filled up my CR-V I-DTEC with Shell V-Power Nitro and my trip computer indicates an improvement in fuel consumption. However, I shall know if this is the case when I next fill up as I will be able to calculate how much fuel I have used rather than rely on the computer.

    The reason I have moved to Shell was due to filling my Accord I-CTDI with Asda diesel when I was towing my caravan to Dorset. I only achieved 25 MPG travelling down, and I then filled up with Sainsbury's diesel and then Shell. Returning home my consumption improved to 30 MPG.

    I used to have a holiday home in France and used to fill up at either the local Intermarché or Leclerc. I never noticed much difference in the engine performance or noise: the diesel engine was always smooth and quiet. Travelling on the autoroutes I used to get around 53 MPG with a fully loaded vehicle. Incidentally, there has been a lot of information on the 'Net about adding two stroke oil to diesel engines. I have just started adding 300ml to the tank when I fill up. The differences between supermarket fuels and Shell and BP are the additives by these companies.
     
  8. pscolling Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Is that wise? Surely adding 2 stroke to the tank will just end up putting more gunk in the DPF and kill it quicker!? I can see it working on older, noisier engines that don't have a DPF but I'd hazard a guess that doing it with the I-DTEC was not advisable! Your call though.
     
  9. Robbie Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Robert Lancashire
    450
    91
    From what I have read TSO burns completely and lubricates the pump etc. There is quite a lot of information on the net, and seemingly it is fine for modern engines with DPFs. I used to use Millers in my i- CTDI, and never had a problem, although it didn't have a DPF.
     
  10. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
    1,157
    202
    1
    I use 2 stroke in my I-CTDI. It is a very quiet engine only experiencing the characteristic diesel 'knock' on start up for about the 1st 300 yards of driving. But when adding 2 stroke the 'knock' sound is reduced by around 70% and during the winter made a marked improvement start up performance.

    Back in the good old days diesel used to contain sulphur this chemical lubricated the internals of the engine reducing the knocking sound. It also created a cleaner more thorough burn during the combustion process. Due to the wonders of EU regulation the levels of sulphur in diesel were reduced to protect the environment. Unfortunately the reduced lubrication shortens engine component life and fuel economy. 2 stroke oil contains high levels of sulphur to lubricate 2 stroke engine and reduce the knocking effect. Effectively by adding 2 stroke oil you are replacing the removed sulphur, restoring the lubrication, and improving the combustion of the engine. My emissions went down 66% in a year after adding 2 stroke to the tank at every fill up. There is lots of information on the net and other forums about adding 2 stroke so the information is out there. It is also safe to use 2 stoke on cars with DPF's but you need to use the right grade of 2 stroke to ensure an optimal burn.
     
    Loading...
  11. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
    1,046
    300
    1
    Hi Doc,
    I can't follow the reasoning.
    => I can imagine that a petrol 2-stroke engine benefits from an additive to reduce knocking (= mixture starts burning before spark plug ignites), so you delay the capacity of the fuel to ignite itself.
    => I have no idea what this has got to do with a diesel engine where you want everything except a delayed ignition of the mixture!?
    To reduce knocking you want the diesel to burn as quick as possible when leaving the nozlle, no? This will reduce the diesel knocking sound (= caused by delayed ignition of fuel). So you don't add something that holds back the self ignition of the used fuel.
    Don't say you're wrong or that I don't believe you, but I don't understand it.
     
    Loading...