Engine & Gearbox Let turbo cool down?

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by royalblue, Tuesday 1st Apr, 2014.

  1. royalblue Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    After a long drive, how important is it to let the turbo cool by leaving the engine ticking over? If so, roughly how many mins?

    Thx
     
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  2. PeteMM Premium Member Club Supporter

    Northern Ireland Pete Belfast, UK
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    on a standard car, generally your long drive will include some slow meandering at the end of the journey which provides more than enough cool down time for the turbo.

    If you are driving it to the point the turbo is glowing, might I suggest you buy a quicker car :Tongue:
     
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  3. royalblue Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I wish mine was the S-Type!
     
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  4. mikey77 Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    My handbook says always allow the I-DTEC to tick over for 10 seconds before switching off. So I do.
     
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  5. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I do too :Drinks:

    Diesel Mitsubishi Pajero's in Australia keep the fan and engine running until it's cooled down - even with the key out of the ignition. !
     
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  6. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
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    I tend to give it a little longer than 10 seconds, maybe around a minute while I sort everything out then turn the engine off as the last thing. If I do drive the car hard I always drive it carefully for the last 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile to let it cool down before it's stationary, but that's also to allow the brakes to cool down as well.

    You could see about fitting a turbo timer which keeps the engine running after the keys have been removed to keep circulating the oil while it all cools down.
     
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  7. nsxer Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    when i owned an evo i was told by my evo specialist that a good minute was beneficial for turbo life prior to switch off
    2 completely different cars, but i will likely try to get back in the habit of doing this with the arrival of my accord in a couple of weeks time
     
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  8. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    The Volvo 440/460 Turbo with the 1.7 Renault petrol engine from the 80's had something similar: there was an extra electric waterpump to cool the (watercooled) turbo after ignition off.
     
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  9. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Clever idea I think. Just felt really odd walking away from a car that was still running.
     
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  10. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    I'm convinced that in most cases it's not needed at all to let the engine idle for more than 5 s or so. Most of the time you can't even use half of the available power. And before parking your car, you usually slow down, some traffic jam, drive 1 or 2 minutes at (very) low speed, spend some extra time with manouvering the car in the parking lot, etc... all giving the turbo time to cool down. Also some engine braking before stopping is good for turbo cooling (cool exhaust gasses + higher oil pressure/flow).
    It is needed to let the engine idle for 1 minute in case of driving at high (!) speed on highway, and than suddenly stop at a service station.
     
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  11. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Very valid points @i-DSI. I agree.
    In northern Europe, ambient air temperatures will help with this cooling.
    In Brisbane where the maximum summer temperatures are over 40C they may need slightly longer cooling.
     
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  12. ricksmith Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi all
    I had an rs turbo escort in the 80's and if I remember rightly that was supplied with a little pamphlet from new telling you to leave the engine running for a certain period of time before shutting off. I believe it was a minute.
    Rick
     
  13. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I would expect the manufacturers to stipulate the maximum time period needed to cool the turbo.
    I'm fairly sure my handbook states 2 minutes. However, as @i-DSI rightly says, the last part of your journey will usually cool it down to an extent.
    I normally leave it running until I'm ready to exit the vehicle - pick up phone, keys, release seatbelt etc.
    However, I do leave it much longer at motorway service areas.
     
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  14. Racy Jace Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    I had a blitz turbo timer in my impreza zo I could leave the car and it would switch off in its own time. You only need to do this if the turbo has got really hot. If the cars been driving at low RPM long enough, the engine temp will only in increase if left to idle anyway so I don't see the sense in letting the Accord diesels tick over for more than 10 seconds. Its not like these cars are going to be pushed like a petrol turbo car.
     
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  15. Dzhedaj Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Makes no sense comparing cars 30 years apart. Even the story about a turbo timer in an Impreza actually is not something to learn from. The modern turbocharger is watercooled (as opposed to oil cooled old counterparts), so after you turn of the engine, the antifreeze keeps circulating because of the way the system is designed - heated fluid at the turbo flows up, being replaced by the incoming cooler one.
    The correct oil grade and service intervals are way more important for a turbocharger lifetime.
     
  16. ricksmith Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I am so sorry.....I was only trying to be helpful!!!!!
    if my memory serves me right either the 1st Generation or 2nd Generation turbo had a water cooled turbo....so there is a point in my post.
    Regards
    Rick
     
  17. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Hi Racy, letting the engine idle to cool the turbo down is not related to the engine coolant temp.
    THE problem when shutting down and engine immediately with a very high turbo temp after high performance is oil carbonisation (burning the oil) in the turbo bearings. Doing this once or a few times is nothing to worry about, but time after time a layer of carbon deposit might build up and finally lubrication is not sufficient anymore. In extreme cases, with very high turbo revs it's also possible to shut of the engine when the turbo is still running at higher then its normal/idle revs. Needles to say this ruins the bearings.
    It's true watercooled turbo's are more resistent to this phenomen, but manufacturers normally only add watercooling simply because the oil temp in the turbo might raise to high with oil lubrication/cooling only. Turbo's are cooled via 3 ways:
    - incoming cool air on the compressor side
    - oil flow (normal cooling)
    - watercooling (optional, when oil only can't do this task.)
    Very important for a long turbo life are indeed following manufacturers' oil + filter recommandations, but even so replace the air filter according to mainenance schedule.
     
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  18. Racy Jace Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    So should us diesel owners be letting the car idle after every journey or just when the turbo has got really warm?

    Cheers
     
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  19. i-DSI Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Definitely not needed after every journey. If I would own a turbo engine than in my typical commuting there would be no need to let the car idle because as well arriving at work as coming back home ends in both cases with some slow driving last miles because of traffic lights and traffic jams and I always park my car in reverse what gives extra time for cooling.
    So I would only do this after high performance driving or in case I'd need to stop the car 'sudden' after some high speed miles. But again: it depends on how your trip 'ends' in your personal case. And if you doubt, well yeah, 5 ot 10 s is already a big difference than nothing at all.
    Honestly, I would be more worried with a diesel engine of driving around with an engine that does not reach its full operating temp (short drive cycles). This creates no ideal lubrication and can lead to DPF problems. I have personally never heard or seen turbo failure on a 2.2 I-DTEC.
     
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  20. Racy Jace Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Thanks. It was just as I thought. let the turbo cool if its been worked.:Thumbup:
     
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