Engine & Gearbox Oil Leak 2.2 CDTi - 7th Generation - A couple of questions...

Discussion in '7th Generation (2003-2008) [Acura TSX]' started by Sphinx, Monday 20th Apr, 2015.

  1. Sphinx Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi,

    I did an oil change over the weekend, but prior to commencing, I noticed a possible oil leak on the side of the Engine.

    Doing a search on here led me to this :

    Engine & Gearbox - 2.2 i-CTDi Oil at Side of Engine

    A bit more investigation reveals possible another leak further on towards the front near the pulley.

    I have attached pictures below and circled areas of interest in red.

    Car has done 79k at present.

    Couple of questions :

    1) Do I need to drain the oil before I redo the gasket on the inspection cover in Pic3 below
    2) I am assuming the leak from the pulley is from the crankshaft seal - is this a garage only job - as I don't have access to any ramps? If so what sort of approx of cost would I be looking at?
    3) Is it worth changing the serpentine belt (I think thats the correct name?) - it look ok, but I guess if pully is coming off it would make sense?

    Thanks in advance.

    Pic1 (Custom).
    Pic2 (Custom).
    Pic3 (Custom).
    Pic4 (Custom).
     
  2. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    The crankshaft seal leaking is rare, but has been reported (it can be a real pig to remove the pulley bolt!). But you appear to have pinpointed the leak to the timing chain tensioner inspection cover? This is easy to remove, clean up and then refit with suitable 'instant gasket' (I used Loctite 5920).

    Where are you located? I have half a tube of sealant left over from when I replaced my timing chains last summer and you're welcome to have it. I can also print you out the relevant section from the Honda Workshop manual as well. And I also have the special locking tool for the crankshaft pulley to aid undoing the bolt, if you need that.

    Best to clean up all traced of the leakage to see exactly where the leak is coming from.
     
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  3. Sphinx Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi Zebster - I'm based in birmingham in that helps - Did you drain the oil first before taking off the cover or can it be done as is?
     
  4. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    @Sphinx as @Zebster says, give all that area a through clean so that you can verify exactly where the leak is coming from.

    Removing a crank pulley can be a real pain, you will need a crank pulley locking tool.
     
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  5. Sphinx Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks guys - Will give a clean up over the weekend (if weather is good) and see how it goes.

    Thanks for all your assistance so far. Cheers.
     
  6. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    You don't need to drain the sump for either of the things discussed.

    I'm a fair way from Birmingham, but if you're ever out my way the offer stands. As Speedy said, the crank locking tool is normally required but, even though I have one, I ending up having to wedge a breaker bar onto the ground and use the starter to shift the bolt. I broke quite a few bits of socket set along the way...

    Let us know where the leak is actually from and I'm sure one of us with a manual can send you the necessary details (esp. Tightening details for the crank pulley... It isn't simply a torque setting, it gets an additional 90 degree turn after being torqued!).

    You asked about the aux belt. If yours is a pre-facelift model (5-speed) then it would be worth checking that it has has the shorter belt mod which takes some strain off the alternator bearing. An idler has to be removed, a 1785mm belt obtained and a different belt routing used. I did mine last year while undertaking the chain swap. It's pretty easy, especially if you are removing the crank pulley anyway (I probably wouldn't bother otherwise, as getting the belt off is a bit of a pig without the special tool, but can be done with a ring spanner and some bent tubing). There is a thread about this somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Monday 20th Apr, 2015
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  7. Sphinx Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi - forgot to mention - mine is a facelift model.

    Just to update - cleaned the affected area over the weekend, will have another look to see if its still leaking - (if weather permits).

    Thanks to all for your input so far.
     
  8. tonygw Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    if it helps the method I use for undoing a crank bolt is to apply 2nd or third gear and have a friend sit in the car and apply the brakes hard. The use the longest crack bar you can find to undo the bolt. Always works for me.. ;-)
     
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  9. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Ouch, ouch, ouch and OUCH !!

    (CV joints, gearbox bearings, second/gear gear sprockets and NEEDLE BEARINGS!!)

    Needle bearings would taking a real battering from this method as they aren't designed to take force like this.

    Probably missed lots of other ouches too !

    My advice DO NOT DO THAT to your engine and gearbox !
     
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  10. tonygw Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    erm................... I might not use that method again then................ erm...... got to go....... ;-)

    Not had need to do it on the Accord so she's safe for now.
     
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  11. DieselPower Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    get some pics up post cleaning. I have some leaks on my FR-V I-CTDI and have kind of given up on them! Please be careful if you decide to snug some of the bolts, the heads come off in the blink of an eye.....don't ask me how I know :Blushing:
     
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  12. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Just to reiterate, do not expect the crankshaft pulley to be easy to get off. IF you're really lucky, then the special locking tool will hold the pulley firmly enough to allow the bolt to be undone without to much fuss BUT I still broke socket extensions AND burnt out the motor on an electric impact wrench allegedly rated at 450 ft.lb! Even overlooking any damage that this might cause, putting the car in gear and applying the brakes would have been practically worthless, as the general 'springiness' of the transmission takes all the sting out of the force you are applying (even more so on a diesel with a highly sprung DMF). In future, I'd go straight for fitting a decent breaker bar to the 19mm bolt, wedging in tightly onto concrete and operating the starter in bursts... BUT BE VERY CAREFUL. And you'll almost certainly need the locking tool to hold the pulley when re-tightening the bolt, as it needs to be torqued up tight, THEN rotated a further 90 degrees (which takes a surprising amount of effort!).

    I later calculated that I had been applying almost 550 lb.ft. of fairly static force by applying my full (and considerable, thanks Greggs) weight to my reasonably long breaker bar, prior to using the starter motor method... it's no wonder I was breaking extensions! And applying the force in this manner has none of the necessary 'shock component' that is really needed. I'm still amazed that the bolt head didn't shear off.
     
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  13. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    I often end up bouncing precariously off the end of a 4 foot long bar getting crank bolts of K series engines.

    I've lost count of the number of extensions and sockets I've broken.
     
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  14. roelfarm Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mike Cheltenham
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    I had a real problem with the pulley bolt on my CR-V gen 3. In spite of having the pulley wheel holder from a previous Honda job I was in despair. A local freelance farm mechanic has a reputation of being able to remove anything on any vehicle.
    I contacted him and within half an hour he came over, after trying conventional brute force and snapping an extension, he said there was only one possible way left. He had brought his Torque Multiplier Tool. What a fantastic bit of kit, it had the pulley bolt off in no time, with ease.
     
  15. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Ohh that sounds like handy tool have around :Grin:
     
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  16. roelfarm Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mike Cheltenham
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    Yes it was a Norbar, with if memory serves a 15:1 ratio. but you can find others. I now know why the chap has a reputation for undoing any bolt. They are I understand commonly used to remove truck wheel bolts
     
  17. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Yep, he's 15 times stronger than your average mechanic :Tongue:
     
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  18. roelfarm Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Mike Cheltenham
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    and the whole nasty nightmare was over inside of an hour, the cost £10
     
  19. Zebster Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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    Interesting, but how did he actually stop the engine from rotating while applying force to the bolt?

    For me, the limiting factor wasn't the amount of force that I could apply (I could have kept 'extending' my breaker bar with tubing and readily achieved 1000lb.ft.) it was finding a socket set strong enough. Maybe if I had a 3/4" drive set it would have survived, but then there'd have been insufficient clearance for the pulley locking tool...
     
    Last edited: Sunday 3rd May, 2015
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  20. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    After breaking a few impact sockets, recently I've been using the socket from my 1/2 inch Draper set that's proving to be a solid socket that seems to handle the job in it's stride.
     
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