Off-Topic Op Garage Overhaul

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Chat' started by Nighthawk, Sunday 8th Mar, 2015.

  1. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    So, in a couple of months I will be leaving my work given house and entering the normal persons mortgage domain. The house has an integrated garage which is 2980mm wide and 5940mm depth, with an entrance door of 2300mm wide which is a larger than normal sized single garage. The owner suffered a stroke a few years ago and has unfortunately been unable to complete numerous projects around the house as a result. I have a garage where I am at the moment but as the house isnt mine, I have never been able to play around with it, or felt the inclination to do so as why should I when the house was just part of a benefit of my work.

    So, I thought, I would see what others thoughts are - I want to give the inside of the garage a good clean up as I am the type of person who will actually use their garage to store their car in, not just fill it full of junk, and it will be used as part workshop as well when needs be so I want it clean (Will be building a proper workshop outside in the garden for my main hobbies - garage to be used when its cold). Not converting it or expecting complete perfection, but I do want it cleaned up and tidyied and I hate doing a half job. The garage is currently a single layer wall on the left side going straight up to the property boundary with an integrated door (always wanted an integral door), the right side of the garage is connected to the side of the house so thats a double wall and a seperate door to the left taking it to the garden. It has a simple up and over door. The upper beams are still exposed and have been that way since the house was built in the 80s.

    Excuse the mess - they are already starting to get their stuff cleared out for the move, but hopefully the pictures will give an idea although the mess makes it hard to see the dimensions properly.

    I will be cleaning the garage up, I know alot of people arent bothered, but I like my houses to be clean and "finished". A brick garage connected to a house is not "finished" in my eyes. OCD kicking in here. Also, it gives me yet another job to do

    My thoughts are this:

    WALLS:
    Option 1 - Layer them with plasterboard and paint. Consideration to be given to moisture penetration as it is a single wall only and prevention of this. Battening, insulation and then plasterboarding will reduce the inner dimensions of the garage. DOT and dab is another option of doing the same sort of thing but with the same considerations.

    Option 2 - Protect the wall with stabiliser, use external masonary paint and freshen it up that way. This is the cheapest option and also guarentees the most amount of room left in the garage.

    Option 3 - Render and plaster the wall. This would be the proper way I guess to do it, but it would also take an inch or so away from the walls on either side, thereby reducing the size of the inner dimensions.

    CEILING:
    Option 1 - Plasterboard the ceiling, poly fill the holes and jointing tape and paint over it. The cheaper and nastier way of doing it

    Option 2 - Plasterboard the ceiling, plaster and paint it

    Will be fitting an extra double flourescent tube in there.

    FLOOR:
    Its concrete so needs to be sealed. Appears in overall good nick from what I can see of it, so I am thinking, just seal it and paint it with some epoxy floor paint.

    Going to automate the garage door as well, so on rainy days, I can just drive straight in and enter the house through the integral door.

    What are everyones constructive thoughts?

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  2. leonard Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    leonard london
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    If it was my garage first thing I would do is ,dig and build a pit on it to service my car.
     
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  3. jd1959 Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Ireland Zack Kilkenny
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    First thing fridge and appropriate beverage inside. I was thinking the same as @leonard cut a pit, board the loft space and be able to use it as storage possibly insulate and plasterboard but personally I would look into tongue and grove paneling on the ceiling (it allows for easier placement and movement of hooks and whatnot for lite loads without leaving obvious damage) and strengthen a spot for a block and tackle, depending on how rural you are waste oil heat, or something similar. Wall treatment and paint, and I do like your idea of the resin flooring. As it looks like you have water/drainage a nice deep sink for hands/parts and other 'dirty' washing.

    Good luck with the new place hope it does you well.
     
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  4. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

    United Kingdom London
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    I think inspection pit is banned now? or hard to get planning permission, also they will probably just get flooded...
     
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  5. leonard Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    leonard london
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    42
    Like I would asked some bureaucrats what will be doing ,how would get flooded inside the garage ?
     
  6. jd1959 Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Ireland Zack Kilkenny
    367
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    The pit can be a lethal trap in many respects and very well may require planning permission, fume extraction, length so you can get out quickly in case of fire or hazardous chemical spillage, appropriate cover to avoid falls, etc the guidelines are pretty strict and for good reason. Groundwater levels can be an issue as well. Horror stories are plentiful with burns, and miserable lingering death. In saying that I know several people who dug a hole lined it with blocks and have been working away for years without problems.
     
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  7. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    I wouldn't put a pit into it, looked at a pit a while ago in another house we were thinking of moving to last year, as @jd1959 says, its covered by all sorts of regulations now. They panic as most car fumes are heavier than air and if they get trapped in the pit, it becomes a fire hazard so you need to have pipes installed to ensure air flow at the bottom of the pit to have evacuate the fumes, as well as access on either side of a car in case you need to get out quickly etc. Being a Honda (second car might not be however but still Japanese after researching my options), don't need to be crawling under it too often.
     
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    exec and SpeedyGee like this.