Service & Maintenance Rear Brakes: Replacing Pads

Discussion in '7th Generation (2003-2008) [Acura TSX]' started by hondream, Sunday 29th May, 2016.

  1. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    Rear Brakes: Replacing Pads, 7th generation accord 2.4 facelift

    Well 1st attempt at changing the pads. Was planning to do the very minimum, but alas no.

    - Divers side rear, the top pin was 90% seized and rusty (see photo - Car seemed to drive ok thou, and no weird noises)
    IMG_20160527_135522.

    The inside of the rubber root was orange with rust.

    Cleaned it all up with fine emery cloth, and applied lots or cera-tec grease.

    Bottom pin was ok, but I cleaned off the old grease and applied fresh grease anyway.
    The vacuum in the pin boots seemed to stop the pins sliding as freely as they should, but thought this will sort it self out as the brakes operate.

    Piston seemed to wind back ok.
    Assembled and torqued up.

    - Passenger side.
    Both pins seemed to slide ok.
    But took both pins out and wiped the old grease off and applied new grease.

    Assembled and torqued up.

    Brake fluid level now just below the maximum level

    At first the brake pedal seemed to go all the way down a number of times, but seemed ok later on. I guess that is normal after a pad change.

    The car stops - lol
    All seems ok.
     
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  2. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Great to see you've got stuck in @hondream
    It's one of those jobs that you now know you can do, so do it every year and you'll keep those brakes working fine.

    If you're not going to bleed the brakes yet, I suggest drawing off the excess fluid (an oral syringe from your local pharmacy will do the job)

    :GoodJob::likeit:
     
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  3. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Congratulations on getting them sorted.
     
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  4. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    Thanks guys.

    That rusted slider pin, the rubber boot didn't have any obvious damage. Am a bit puzzled how it got so corroded? Is it possible that the boot has pin hole perhaps.
     
  5. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Water/moisture will work its way in. That's why they need re-greasing each year.
    Once the water's in there, it is harder for it to get out. If there's not enough grease, the metal will corrode.
     
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  6. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    Disk Temperatures:-
    Never really taken any notice of this before or tried testing for it.
    But the rear disks feel a bit hotter than the front ones.
    I'm just putting my finger(s) on the disks.

    Is this normal for the Accord 2.4?
    Is it normal while the new pads bed in.

    I should of really checked it before I changed the rear pads, but the thought never occurred to me.
    No weird noises or smoke or anything like that.
    Car will start rolling if it is on a slight slope.
     
  7. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Guys, it is easy to see something which is not an issue here. Your rear discs are smaller than the front ones as they do less braking, its around 70% braking on the front and 30% on the rear. This is because of the heavier weight up front in comparison to the rear. As the discs are smaller, they absorb less friction before getting hot and due to the smaller surface area, dissipate it slower too. The front discs are bigger, more ventilation and more surface area to dissipate heat effectively. The fronts do do more braking, however they roughly balance themselves out. It doesnt take much of a braking session to get the discs up to a temperature where it will easily burn your fingers if you touch them.

    If your brakes are seizing, you will know all about it. You will smell it, you will see the signs (white bands, or smoke etc) and you will feel the car losing its effectiveness if they get too hot.

    The discs will naturally get hot, thats how they work. They take the heat from the friction which makes them slow down and dissipate it. If its an issue, you will know about it for sure.

    :Thumbup:
     
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  8. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    I think everything is working ok.

    Other small little observations, that aren't really important for the experienced, but may help a novice.

    The bolt that goes into the slider pin takes a 13mm spanner (on my car anyway).
    The spanner that fits the slider pin needs to be fairly thin, as my standard one was a very tight fit.

    When undoing the bolts be very careful that the rubber boots don't twist as they may get damaged/torn/ripped.

    Thanks to everyone for their help.
     
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  9. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    Great titbits of info there @hondream :Niceone:, its the small stuff which makes all the difference.

    Glad you got it all sorted in the end
     
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  10. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    Thanks.

    I'm adding bits and pieces as I find them, in no particular order.
    Feel free to correct if there are any mistakes.

    Make sure that the 2 slots in the piston are at 12 and 6 o'clock.
    Slots.
     
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  11. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
    237
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    I should say that my car uses the Lucas brake system.
    I think some Accords use different braking systems.

    This the caliper from the drivers side, with the seized slider pin.
    The 2 slots in the piston are not at 12 and 6 o'clock. I think (but i could be wrong) this is a sure sign that the something is wrong. In my case, it was the seized slider pin.

    As the little stud on the back of the inner brake pad won't be sitting in one of those slots in the piston, and therefore not pushing the pad evenly.
    IMG_20160527_134209Piston.
     
  12. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    That was probably installed wrong when the pads were put in last.
     
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  13. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
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    I think you're right Speedy.

    Puzzling thing is, it has only ever been to a Honda Main dealer every year.......so i wasn't expecting to find basic mistakes.......>>>
     
  14. hondream Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Simon Walsall
    237
    64
    BrakeRewindPiston. Possibly some info for beginners.
    I wasn't sure how far to rewind the piston. So to be sure I made sure it went slightly past the face marked by the red arrow. Perhaps someone with more experienced car confirm.

    Also, after assembly, when you get in the car it's natural to put the hand brake on first. Don't do this as I believe this will rotate the piston out of position.
    Press the brake pedal first so as to push the piston out in a straight line so that the recesses in the piston engage with the pins on the back on the pads.