Suspension, Steering and Brakes Replacing the Rear Brake Discs

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by mart, Tuesday 28th Oct, 2014.

  1. mart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi, I noticed that my rear brake pads are very worn, which is not a concern due to the age of the car. Being an amateur DIYer it's the kind of job that I'm happy to have a bash at myself. While I'm at it I thought that I'd also change the disks (A bit of Edd China's influence there).
    Now I've replaced disks on previous cars that I've owned & it seems to be a pretty straight forward task, however I do like to be prepared & usually seek advice for any available hints, tips prior to commencing. I'm sure we all know that there's nothing worse than dismantling your car only to find that you need a special tool & the shop shuts in half an hour & you're immobile.
    Anyway this is where the trail runs cold, I just cannot seem to find any information on the subject of rear disk replacement on the 8th Generation Accord. I'm aware that there are 2 possible sizes of disk yet I cannot seem to determine the size of mine (2008, EX), without physically taking the wheel off to check. Has anyone on here replaced the disks themselves before? & would you have any tips? Are there any guides available? Thanks in advance.
     
    Loading...
  2. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,976
    3
    There is two different brake set-ups on the UKDM 8th Generation, you have the standard set-up, with the larger only found on the 2.4 i-VTEC and the 2.2 Type-S I-DTEC.

    It's good practice to change the pads with discs so that any uneven wear from the old pads doesn't start marking your new discs, however it's not essential and most of us folk are OCD. The part numbers you need if going for genuine are:
    • 42510-SEA-E00 - Rear Discs
    • 43022-SEA-E10 - Rear Pads
    As for the disc replacement itself, it's very simple indeed, you're pulling a wheel off, removing the caliper sliders, removing the pads, then removing the carrier bolts, and finally the disc itself. The only parts which people ever tend to find a stumbling block are either, seized carrier bolts, or stubborn retaining screws for the discs. The latter I would thoroughly recommend investing in an impact driver for, it takes all the hassle out of the job. Another tip would be to soak the carrier bolts in penetrating oil the night before, however I've never done this and have always managed to get them off.

    Here you'll find Vital Brakes Maintenance Information for the 8th Generation Accord, and this guide here by @Nels for the 7th Generation rears should be pretty much identical to your car (aside from perhaps socket sizes).

    If you do get stuck in, please do a little write-up so others have a guide to work from in the future :Smile:
     
    Loading...
  3. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
    14,999
    5,591
    4
    You beat me to it @DeviateDefiant and pretty much covered all the points.
     
    Loading...
  4. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    don't forget a clockwise wind back tool either for pushing the rear pistons back into the calipers....

    Look forward to your DIY @mart
     
    Loading...
  5. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,976
    3
    Oh, good point on that one. Wind back tool is a must!
     
    Loading...
    Nighthawk likes this.
  6. mart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Thanks for the speedy response guys. I'll definitely post my adventure.
    Now I know its Heath Robinson, but in the past I've used a G-clamp with a piece of wood to reset the callipers. Would this be a bad idea in this case?
    On side note, I'm sad to hear that Honda have decided to curb any future Accords in the UK.
     
    Loading...
  7. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,976
    3
    Long as you're spreading the pressure evenly across the exposed face of the piston and they can turn, I wouldn't see that being an issue :Smile:

    We all are mate, but hopefully to see something to answer our prayers around 2016.
     
    Loading...
  8. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
    14,999
    5,591
    4
    The rear calipers can't just be pushed in, they need to be twisted in, which is where the rewind tool comes in handy.
     
    Loading...
  9. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    @mart - for the fronts, yeah, I have always pushed them in.

    For the rears though, you cannot just push the pistons back in . They have to be wound in as @SpeedyGee has said. This will be a stumbling block for you if you do not have one of these tools, they arent expensive - around 20 quid or so. I have a Sealey one which worked perfectly. They have to be pushed in whilst being wound at the same time - hence the need for the tool.

    You can get a clockwise and an anti clockwise threaded tool - Hondas need the clockwise thread so make sure you get the right one.
     
    Loading...
  10. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    IMHO, the correct wind back tool is money well spent. Additionally, the pistons can be very stubborn to move. The correct tool can overcome this.
     
    Loading...
    Nighthawk likes this.
  11. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,976
    3
    I brought the set below for £7 at the time (now £9.47), cannot fault it whatsoever and have now used it on several cars:

     
    Loading...
    Nighthawk likes this.
  12. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    Just checked my ebay acccount, mine was less than a tenner.

    Chap isnt selling it anymore but there are plenty around

    For example

     
    Loading...
  13. DeviateDefiant Co-Founder Staff Team

    United Kingdom Leo Northants
    9,206
    2,976
    3
    That's identical to mine by the looks of it, just a rebranded generic sold by many I'd imagine.
     
    Loading...
  14. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    Just checked the model number - that listing there is identical to the one I bought!! Sweet!

    @mart - I imagine you will need one of these as it sounds like you don't have that - -that one from my link will work fine - the studs are 22mm apart which is right for our cars and is a clockwise thread.
     
    Loading...
  15. mart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Nice one fellas, this was exactly the kind of experienced info that I was hoping for when I posted the thread. I'll Invest a bit of small change in one of these gizmos. :Grin:
     
    Loading...
  16. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    Also, my input - break the bleed nipple open when you are winding it back - takes less pressure to push and wind it back as it is not going through the entire braking system then and is just coming out of the nipple. Apart from which, I have never personally liked pushing back into the system against the seals the wrong way so having it come straight out of the nipple makes it easier to wind back and saves a bit of mess and grief.
     
    Loading...
  17. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    Also saves the brake reservoir overflowing if you didn't remove some beforehand.
     
    Loading...
    Nighthawk likes this.
  18. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
    14,999
    5,591
    4
    All good points guys, just to add to that, you'll need to check the reservoir level after you've finished and top up as necessary.

    One other thing to watch out for is as you are twisting the caliper back in, keep an eye on the rubber seal, if its twisting with the piston, stop the twisting and try and unfree it from the caliper. If you carry on twisting the caliper it will rip the rubber seal. Just use a small thin screw driver and unstick the rubber seal from the grove in the caliper.
     
    Loading...
    Nighthawk and Nels like this.
  19. mart Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Hi guys, Well I'm afraid that my grand DIY plans didn't actually go as planned. With an 'It'll be fine' attitude, I bought some aftermarket non Honda the parts, including the wind-back tool. I had all my tools set out & I intended on changing the disks & pads on one side, a practice run so to speak. Then I would photograph & document my work on the opposite side, as I'd have a better idea of what I was doing. I didn't get that far. Although to be fair, for reasons I'll come to, I didn't even attempt the second side.

    So off I set, the wheels came off & the first 2 calliper pins came out. Going off Nels guide, the orange nut was 12mm & I think the blue nut was 15mm. With a bit of grappling I managed to free the calliper from the bracket. So next I set about to take the disk off & this is proved to be my first stumbling block. One of the 2 retaining screws just would not budge. I attacked it with my impact driver & lump hammer a good 10 -15 times before I thought 'This just isn't going to happen'. For my troubles, I did manage to earn myself a nice blood blister on my palm. Now my car was already booked in for a service at my local garage on the Monday so I made the decision to let them tackle this with the parts I'd bought. In the meantime I thought that I'd at least put the new pads on because they'd only be used for the short journey to the garage.

    Stumbling block number 2, the outer pads were too long & wouldn't fit, even though on first inspection they seemed to be fine. But the inner pads were totally wrong. Well actually I don't know if it was the pads that were wrong or my brake pistons. With the piston, I was expecting to see a raised disk with a cross recessed into it to accommodate the wind-back tool. What I found was a hollow piston & the inner pad had a 3 pronged claw like spring clip on the back which was pushed into the hollow. I can only guess that Honda had plenty of these left over from the 7th Generation Accord & decided to fit them to my early 8th Generation car. Suggestions on a postcard please! So I actually ended up putting my old worn pads back on my car, nightmare! As previously mentioned my next & only journey would be to the local garage.

    So in the end I decided to let my garage do all the work including sourcing the proper Japanese parts. The mechanic later told me that his supplier actually sent 2 different sets of pads as they didn't know which were the correct ones. So including the service & brake replacement I'm £430 lighter in the pocket but I've got peace of mind that my car is now sorted. Also, I'll be getting a refund on my unfitted Pagid parts.

    Now I could have posted on here saying that everything went well & that I didn't have time to document it or take pictures, but I'd rather tell my story so that others can learn from it.

    So lessons learned...Sometimes it can seem like a false economy to get your own hands dirty. If you are going to do DIY, listen to the experts, I.e. "Don't buy inferior parts". Giving oneself a blood blister smarts.
     
    Loading...
  20. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
    5,369
    3,141
    14
    Sorry it didnt quite go as planned mate but glad its at least sorted now. When i replaced my rear discs, i couldn't get them off either due to the retaining screws. Ended up drilling their heads off, popping the disc off and then manipulating the remainder of the the screw out and replacing it with new ones.

    My rear calipers come in two flavours, lucas and ate i think they are. Ferodo had two different pads for my rears so had to clean the calipers to see the manufacture before i purchased them.

    Agreed about inferior parts, don't like pagid. I believe they are also OEM for vag group but stand to be corrected.
     
    Loading...