Suspension, Steering and Brakes Too much power steering fluid

Discussion in '6th Generation (1997-2002)' started by Btppc, Tuesday 5th May, 2015.

  1. Btppc Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Bordon
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    The idiot that owned the car before me has put too much fluid in the reservoir. Will this have any side effects? Steering seems heavy. And what does Honda fluid look like?
     
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  2. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    Honda fluid looks redish in colour IIRC.

    Too much fluid won't hurt as you can only get so much in the closed loop system anyway. The extra will just stay in the reservoir.

    Wonder why he over topped it ? Maybe there is a fault with the system ?

    Given you have heavy feeling at the steering I'd be tempted to replace the power steering fluid with correct Honda fluid.
     
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  3. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

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    You can suck it out easily with a syringe too if you wanted.
     
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  4. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Yup as @exec just pointed out get you your local pharmacy and get a big syringe and pull out till its to the top mark.
     
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  5. Btppc Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Bordon
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    Am I right in thinking Honda power steribg fluid is dot3, I will get this done ASAP, fluid at the moment seems browny if that's a word.
     
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  6. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    This is what the workshop manual says :-

     
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  7. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

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    DOT 3 is typically a brake fluid not PSF, as Speedy has qouted above ONLY use Honda PSF, use anything else and say goodbye to your PS pump.
     
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  8. Chunkylover53 Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    I remember telling @Harvey that I used DOT3 as PSF, nearly two years now and it still works :Blushing:. That said I fully intend on draining and replacing it with proper PSF next month especially since the steering has been getting heavier lately.
     
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  9. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

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    I'm surprised it still works :Tongue:, brake fluid should eat away at the seals in the PS system.
     
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  10. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Power steering fluid is easy to replace, you can use a syringe to do it but that will take forever.

    there are other ways and the way I chose would be the quickest. You will need a few tools to do this though.

    Tools needed
    socket set with extension bar (I think the socket needed was 10mm)
    pliers
    screwdriver
    1 metre or so of 38mm hose or similar.

    1. unbolt the fluid resevoir from the engine bay and tilt backwards so that the bottom pipe has an air pocket to prevent too much fluid loss
    2. carefully removed the bottom hose off the resevoir, be carefull not to snapp the pipe off the reservoir like I did as that would be a very bad day indeed. The hose if memory serves is just held on by a spring clamp, so pliers are best for this. If the hose will not budge, clamp with the pliers and twist it to help break the seal.

    3.insert the return hose into the 38mm pipe and run that into a catch can
    4 start the engine, run it for maybe 20 seconds, you should not need longer than this to drain the system as it pumps pretty quick. then stop the engine.
    5. re attatch the pipework and reservoir to the body
    6, fill with Honda PSF (Costs around £15 for a litre, takes about half a litre)
    7. start the engine and turn the steering wheel lock to lock several times, check fluid level and top up as nesscery. The power steering pump may make a funny noise at this stage, don't worry, its normal. This is to help bleed trapped air out of the system.
    8. stop the engine and leave for about 10 minutes, this should be plenty of time to let the rest of the air escape from the system
    9. check level again, put the cap back on and you have now changed your fluid.
     
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  11. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    I've said this previously but I'll say it again for those that may have missed it. I don't like this method as there is risk of running the pump dry and these pumps don't like running dry.

    Plus there chance of introducing air bubbles into the system.

    The slowly but surely process is the one for me.
     
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  12. Nighthawk Guest

    United Kingdom Richard Milton Keynes
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    A rule i often work by on cars is the quicker the method, the more expensive any subsequent repair is likely to be
     
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  13. Harvey Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    I am not saying this method is right or wrong, for what it's worth the pump is driven for a very short time and in my opinion any risk of damage is minimal, however the risk is far greater with the wrong fluid in. Each to their own and each has their preferred method.

    I would also like to add that this is the very same method that I used to replace mine and I have experienced no ill effects
     
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  14. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

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    That method is very similar to the official Honda method for the 6th Generation from the service manual, so I would imagine it would be fine, although personally I would be reluctant to run the pump dry because its 15 years old with lots of wear and tear and won't be as strong as it was when new.
     
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  15. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    I did mention that I (personally) don't like that method and that I prefer the slow method of doing.

    So yes, everyone will have their own preference but there's nothing wrong with highlighting the potential dangers.

    Yes Honda service manuals mention this method but there's a difference between a professional doing it and an amateur doing.
    The professional will have been taught how to do it right and will do it many times. An amatuer will just be reading a book and it's task that he/she will probably do once in a blue moon. So the margin for error is much greater.
     
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  16. Btppc Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Bordon
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    his guys, sorry been having major dramas with my Internet and phone. I'll definitely be replacing the fluid then, might be a dumb question, but if I use the syringe method, that won't get all of it out as opposed to the running the pump method will it? And seeingbthat it seems I have the wrong fluid would the latter not be better?
     
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  17. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    You are correct the syringe method will only dilute it but going repeating the syringing and the percentage of old fluid will diminish.

    You maybe better off taking to a garage that can can do the full flush for you, using the other method.
     
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  18. exec Premium Member Club Supporter

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    The syringe is used to only get it out of the container, to fully drain the whole system of the oil you of course need to follow the methods mentioned.
     
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  19. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

    England Speedy Birmingham
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    @exec a lot of us have been using the syringe method so replenish the fluid also. It just needs to be repeated about 5 or 6 times.