Off-Topic VOSA Ford Galaxy on the M62

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Chat' started by Ichiban, Wednesday 31st Jul, 2013.

  1. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    For a number of years on the M62 around junction 18 through 20 these Ford Galaxy are parked sheepishly and silently cheery picking on trucks and lorries.They even have a sign which instructs them to follow them to a holding area.

    My question to anyone what is the role of these vans how are they legally allowed to stop trucks and commercial vesicles?
     
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  2. ArcticFire-Account Closed Banned Getting Started

    Scotland Graham Scotland
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    Looks like they've got the powers and then given even more powers!


    Powers to stop vehiclesUnder the Police Reform Act 2002, section 41 and Schedule 5,[5] Chief Constables could grant powers (under a Community Safety Accreditation Scheme) to VOSA officers to stop vehicles, for checks on vehicle and driver compliance without the need for police support (later expanded to stop any vehicle, although mainly goods and passenger carrying vehicles). At that time, only police officers had the power to stop vehicles and therefore had to be present. The powers were piloted in 2003 and brought more widely into force in 2004.[6]

    Following a consultation in July 2010,[7] the law was overhauled in 2011 to grant VOSA officers the power to stop vehicles without relying on police approval through Community Safety Accreditation Schemes as above. This also allowed VOSA officers to stop vehicles in Scotland, as well as in England and Wales as previously. The amendment, which was made by the Road Vehicles (Powers to Stop) Regulations 2011, allows "stopping officers" approved by the Department for Transport to stop vehicles for certain reasons.[8]
    To be appointed as a stopping officer, a person must:[8]

    • be a suitable person to exercise the powers of a stopping officer,
    • be capable of effectively exercising their powers, and
    • have received adequate training for the exercise of their powers.
    Officers must be in uniform to stop vehicles.[8] Impersonating or obstructing stopping officers is an offence.[8]
     
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  3. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    looks like they have covered all basses there? Thanks Graham.
     
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  4. ArcticFire-Account Closed Banned Getting Started

    Scotland Graham Scotland
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    No worries, we have to deal with them all the time. Since upgrading the fleet to newer vehicles we've had less hassle, although it's time for another upgrade....£££££
     
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  5. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Only been pulled a few times by them and there's never been anything wrong with the truck/trailer/tachos luckily but you loose so much time and it's an inconvenience they can now fine us for all sorts of rubbish too.

    They are always at the docks pulling people as they come off the boats at Immingham.
     
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  6. Brodziu Valued Contributor ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆

    Greg Manchester
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    they also checking buses, it didn't happened to me, but to other drivers from my depot when they get to terminus they were asked to show all the documents ie. driver licence or cpc card and then they checked the bus ringing on every bell :Tongue:
     
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  7. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    It's like a roadside MOT test when they pull you over as well, some stations they even put the lorry over an open pit and proper go to town on it!
     
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  8. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Easy targets isnt it , It nothing to do with Safety it all about filling the coffers up on technicalities.
     
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  9. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    Absolute bonkers do they go round checking tyre pressures ,engine oil level and windscreen washer fluid level?
     
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  10. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Actually they tap the wheel nuts with a hammer to see if any are loose! Check lights, tyres for tread depth and cuts/damage etc check for air leaks on the brakes as well as all the stuff underneath like suspension air bags measure the length of travel until the trailer brakes activate etc. They can advise if they find something or if its a bit more serious they can ban the vehicle from being moved until the fault is rectified. They operate a traffic light system if your a green operator you rarely get pulled amber you get pulled a bit and red there out to get you lol.

    Also if a truck or trailer fails its MOT test that goes against your score so you always want to make sure your vehicles pass 1st time.

    Hgvs are meant to get an inspection every 6 weeks by a mechanic or competent person they should spot things and rectify them before they develop into faults.

    Now here's an interesting one we pull Dutch trailers for a Dutch company now if we get stopped with one of these trailers and there's something wrong with it we get into trouble for it and it goes against our operators license score not the actual people whose trailer it is!
     
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  11. ArcticFire-Account Closed Banned Getting Started

    Scotland Graham Scotland
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    We have a zero tolerance when it comes to loose wheel nuts and the drivers are responsible for checking over their trucks every morning. Just had one recently, I've got the whole incident on CCTV and also have photos of the damage it had done to other components of the wheel, over £1,500 damage just from loose wheel nuts! Obviously the danger to the public is obvious. We've been on a green light with VOSA for quite some time now and have found they tend to leave you alone more after you've got your act together. Used to run much older trucks that always had problems, but the newer ones are ok - but as said they are 2009 plates so time to change.

    I guess you always get the over zealous ones with any organisation, but judging from the state of some of the 3rd party trucks that come into our facility it's maybe not a bad thing that VOSA are proactive (although I'm sure the monetary aspect is a big driving force - excuse the pun). I suppose the outcome of an HGV going wrong on the motorway is almost guaranteed to cause mayhem, but then what about driver errors, i.e. overtired? I suppose tachos are supposed to sort that out to some extent.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Here's some photos showing the mechanic with the parts after a driver had been cutting about on loose wheel nuts for a week or so. You can see the shiny bits where they were loose and also the damage (shiny bit again). There's also a shot of the new part fitted.


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  12. Ichiban Founder Staff Team

    England CJ Leeds
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    This best practice should be followed by car owners too. I check the wheel bolts for torque when I change the engine oil.

    Thanks Graham
     
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  13. Doc Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Matt Peterborough
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    I actually think that sounds fair. The operator, in this case a Dutch company, is unable to check their own trailers before each operation because they are in a different location. In any other situation it's up to the driver/ operator to ensure their vehicles aren't overweight etc, so why shouldn't they be making sure the trailer they are pulling is road legal as well?

    If it was your own companies trailer they would (hopefully) make sure it was road legal so why not ones they operate through a 3rd party. I'm not suggesting they should bear the cost of maintaining it but it can't be that hard to give it a quick once over before sending it out to pick up anything obvious.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I thought those luminous plastic caps with the arrows on that go over the wheel nuts were meant to indicate loose wheel nuts. How do they still manage to go unnoticed?
     
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  14. Dave Expert Advisor ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Yeah it is the drivers responsibility to check over any trailer they pick up be it a foreign one or a uk registered one. However we can only do a visual check of lights, tyres, wheel nuts and make sure nothing is hanging off (like mudguards). We can't crawl underneath it and check out what VOSA will see when they put it over a pit nor can we check if there is too much travel on the bars that push the brakes on. If we pick a trailer up and see something wrong with it we report it and it gets repaired here in the uk before we take it out on the road. I just think its a bit unfair that there could be something we can't see and we get penalised for it thats all.

    These trailers spend most of there life on the road or at sea, I will pick one up and unload it then reload it and take it back to the docks it will then sail that night and arrive in Rotterdam the next morning where it will then be unloaded somewhere and then reloaded and stuck back on a ship and the same then happens again and again and again. They really do get some hammer as tug drivers bash them about whilst loading them on and off the boats as well as getting battered by the elements on a rough crossing as there are 2 decks that are open to the elements.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Not everyone uses them, our trucks don't have them and neither do any of the trailers we pull.
     
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  15. ArcticFire-Account Closed Banned Getting Started

    Scotland Graham Scotland
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    I was going to mention them in my last post but decided not to. We don't use them, I did ask about it but according to what the garage tell me they are a pain in the batty when having to change tyres, fix punctures etc. I later discovered that it's almost as easy to spot a loose nut without them because you'll see the shiny bits. I wasn't convinced until I watched the CCTV of our Transport Manager walking past a 4x2 and doing a double take at the rear offside wheel from about 2-3 metres. The result? The photos above! I learn something new every month, which I love!
     
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