Suspension, Steering and Brakes Whirring noise from front / rear wheel bearing - 48K miles!

Discussion in '8th Generation (2008-2015) [Acura TSX]' started by nonda, Sunday 2nd Mar, 2014.

  1. nonda Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Had occasion to emergency brake at motorway speed several months ago - the 8th Generation certainly stopped well. However, upon resuming journey there was a slight speed related whirring noise which appeared to emanate from the front end of the car. Had the stop warped a disc, or upset a gearbox/driveshaft bearing? Subsequently checked discs/pads on all corners, nothing found which might give a clue as to noise, but cleaned up disc edges just in case. Nothing found on drive shafts. My thoughts were turning to gearbox. Over the next few weeks the whirring subsided to a general tyre/rumbling noise. Was the Accord that noisy before the incident? The mind starts playing tricks. Several months later, very evident play in offside rear wheel bearing. Bearing assembly changed and noise gone. Indeed, can confirm the 8th Generation is a quiet car. Would not like to hazard a guess as to how long the failing rear bearing has been gradually ramping up general car noise until it was tipped into rapid decline by the emergency stop.

    In summary - the rear bearing did give the classic symptoms of whirring noise, then subsiding for a while, before entering catastrophic failure mode. However, the noise appeared to come from the front of the car – which threw me a little. When checking discs there was no particular noise or wheel rock when spinning wheel under no load. However, now that I am aware that rear wheel bearings can fail after a relatively short time/mileage – I will give them very careful check.

    Hope the tale is of use to others, especially if your motor seems to generate a little more rumble on the motorway that you recalled.
     
  2. SpeedyGee Administrator Staff Team

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    Nonda, was the tracking/wheel alignment all correct on your car ? Incorrect alignment can lead to premature wheel bearing failure.
     
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