A question about CETANE!?

Discussion in 'Honda N-Series' started by triscottalexander, Tuesday 28th Feb, 2017.

  1. triscottalexander Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom triscott Reading
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    Hi all!
    Laws of physics and such will tell you that a longer combustion will provide you with a more efficient bang.
    Now a cetane rating on a diesel fuel will give you an indication of how quickly the fuel will ignite under certain conditions (higher cetane number the quicker it will ignite e.c.t.). In a four cylinder N Series engine the main condition is compression (like most diesels).
    At the moment, i only fill up with shell diesel v power nitro.
    my question is not whether these fuels are better or not, but rather does anyone have any in depth knowledge to tell me if the Honda N Series diesels are tuned to run on the slightly less dense 'fancy' diesels or whether they prefer conventional 'dirty' diesel??
    Reason i bring it up is that on my old 2.0 accord se executive, that thing used to seem to love the bog standard asda fuel and felt weak on normal shell or esso stuff!

    interested to hear peoples thoughts??

    Regards,
    Alex T
     
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  2. Nels Moderator Staff Team

    I can't answer your question re the N series, but without question, when I use VPN and BPUD in our 'other car', it is far more responsive. If they also keep things 'clean' and 'clear', then that's an added bonus.

    We will have to wait for the diesel guys to give you a more accurate reply about the i_CTDi/I-DTEC.
     
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  3. triscottalexander Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom triscott Reading
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    20
    Yeah, i mean there is a lot to be said for how a car feels! good to hear your thoughts though as an acccord owner with an I-DTEC!

    Regards,
    Alex T
     
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  4. cat-guy Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    cat-guy United Kingdom
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    Without me spending hours writing please do a web search against EN590 diesel.
     
  5. triscottalexander Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom triscott Reading
    20
    20
    hey @cat-guy
    im aware of the standard en950. maybe i wasn't clear enough but the question is more tailored towards the performance of the N series Engines. obviously were fairly lucky in this country where the standard must meet a cetane rating of 51 and as a result the diesel is dense in comparison to somewhere like US. Any thoughts on whether the N series can take advantage of the 'optimised' fuels? Shell, BP e.c.t

    Regards
    Alex T
     
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  6. i-DSI Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    Hi Alex,
    I do not drive a diesel car, but I do want to make a note at what you write above. You might be confusing a few things?
    The cetane rating tells you indeed at what pressure/temp the diesel will ignite. The easier it ignites, the better. But it is not a number that tells you haw fast or how slow the fuel will burn. There's no influence on the cumbustion itself.
    You write that a longer combustion will provide a more efficient bang. This is not true. If the combustion takes to long, the burning will even continue when the exhaust valves are open... no use at all. On top of that: the more 'bang' you have the moment the piston starts going down, the more efficient your engine will perform (that's because of the angle cranckshaft and connecting rod).
    The burning speed of the mixture (petrol or diesel) depends mainly of the quality of the mixture (temp, vaporisation, design of the head, injectordesign, sparkplug, engine speed, richness...).
    What I write above is applicable to both petrol and diesel.
    I might misunderstand what you meant to explain, if so, please correct me.
     
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  7. 1066Boy Premium Member Club Supporter

    Not sure on the whole science side (not my strong point) but I will say that over many years of driving different types of vehicles, both petrol and diesel you are better off using
    quality fuel rather than cheap stuff. Most of the time performance changes are so small you won't notice it but the better fuels are cleaner burning and will be slightly better
    MPG. I have proved this many times from bikes to trucks. :Smile:
     
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  8. i-DSI Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Belgium Aalst
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    Alex,
    If it comes to your main question: "tell me if the Honda N Series diesels are tuned to run on the slightly less dense 'fancy' diesels or whether they prefer conventional 'dirty' diesel??".
    Having worked over 20 years in the automotive industry (motorcycles, trucks and cars) I can assure you that a manufacturer will always design its product (engine in this case) prepared for the worst case scenario, meaning cheap, lowest allowed (! important word) fuel on the markets where the engine will be sold. Why would you spend money on improved performance by design for the extremely low % of customers that do will fuel up with the better fuels? And even than, most will not even feel or measure it.
    The advantage of more expensive fuels comes from the fuel itself, not the engine. Just like the advantage you have of the better engine oil.
    I'd say if you can afford the better fuel, buy it. At least if you feel happy with it. Me, I always fill up at the station where I pass by when the 'low on fuel' light comes up. And I never felt or measured any difference, not in consumption, not in performance. I do not say it's not there, I just say I don't feel it. And I do fill up from time to time with expensive fuel (Esso, Shell, Texaco...).
     
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