General Split wafers (tumblers) for ignition barrel

Discussion in '6th Generation (1997-2002)' started by dandreye, Monday 12th Feb, 2018.

  1. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    Hi All,

    Is there a place to buy (retail) reasonably priced decent quality split wafers aka tumblers for ignition barrel used in UK made 6th Generation Accord? The one in my 1999 (T-reg) started giving me some grief recently, so I had to remove the whole ignition switch assembly from the drive column and am thinking of replacing them all with brand-new ones. No luck googling them so far...

    Many thanks in advance!
     
  2. Fiskekutteren Club Member ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Denmark Roskilde
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    I am guessing that you might need to go to a Honda dealership, they should be able to help you or maybe a locksmith.
    But i personally does not have any experience with this, but maybe some of the other members do :Smile:
     
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  3. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    Thanks for your reply. I've seen 2 (non-auto) locksmiths at nearby supermarkets and one said they're not allowed to do that kind of job while the other said they're not trained to do it: they both do only key cutting. I then rang a few auto locksmiths and they charge something like GBP80-120 for the job that I could easily do myself now that I have most of it done anyway, so what's the point. I'll then talk to a nearby Honda dealership indeed: perhaps they can supply those wafers (tumblers) alone, which shouldn't be that expensive...
     
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  4. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    A dealer won't be able to get something like that. Think of it, the entire switch arrives at the factory from a supplier which is contracted to supply just-in-time for the assembly of the cars. I doubt if even the switch supplier would have stock of the individual bits.
     
  5. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    That makes sense indeed, however in some Youtube videos the barrel repairers are talking about ordering those tiny items somewhere. I've only come across one supplier of those tiny items based in the US so far. Perhaps overseas shipping won't cost much as they're so lightweight... will ask them although finding a local supplier would be ideal.
     
  6. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    I just googled "cylinder lock pins" then make sure you look at any page that has a .co.uk url

    It brings up mostly suppliers of full cylinder locks, but there are a few suppliers of parts e.g. Repinning tools - Largest Lock Pick Shop - Walker Locksmiths

    You might have to try quite a few suppliers to find somewhere selling a small quantity of the right size.

    Otherwise the US comes up with more suppliers of what you need
     
  7. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    Thank you. I'm looking at the likes of this one in the meantime - just asked them if they stock what I'm after:
    R&H Wholesale Supply
     
  8. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    That is a good find and looks your best bet.
    However if wear to the original casing was the cause of the barrel jamming, there is the danger that it might happen again when re-assembled with new pins. Depending on the way the cylinder lock works, have you tried re-assembling with one or two sets of pins removed ?
    - - - Updated - - -
    i.e. the set(s) of pins that were causing the barrel to jam.
     
  9. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    Tbh I didn't dare removing the cylinder itself from its housing as yet: looks like those pins and sprints may jump out. The first thing I intend to do once I carefully take it out is write/decode their combination to be able to reassemble it later no matter what. Unfortunately I'm having to deal with a somewhat more urgent issue in parallel at the moment (a couple of front suspension parts need urgent replacing to stop rapidly eating tyres) and will get back to the barrel/cylinder stuff right after. Btw forgot to say that I recently bought a used spare barrel assembly with the key (GBP30 paid) and if it turns out to be worn casing causing the jamming indeed I'll just move repaired original cylinder and immo over to the spare housing and so will carry on using the original keys or at least the better one of them that I'm using now.
     
  10. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    Your best bet is to see if you can get out the original sets of pins in their correct arrangement, remove the sets of pins from the substitute lock (noting their arrangement so that you can use the substitute key if necessary), and replace the original sets into the substitute lock.

    Alternatively, just remove the pins from the original lock, and use it without any pins. Although the lock can then be rotated with any key or even a screwdriver, the car still requires the immobiliser chip in the original key for the engine to start. This is what I did on an old car I had (and that's how I know how these locks work).
     
  11. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    From what I remember, the barrel had slightly fractured along the section where the holes for the pins are, which meant that the pins no longer lined up completely. Getting the pins out and then the barrel out (to have a look at the barrel) wasn't too difficult considering that I had already decided to put it all back together without and pins in the lock. But I would think that getting pins and barrel out, with any chance of reassembling successfully, will need special tools.
     
  12. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
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    I assume I'd have to be quite lucky to have similar set of pins (#1-#6) in both locks to be able to swap them all, e.g. if I have, say, a total of 3x #1 in the original lock then the spare one would also need to contain exactly 3x #1 in any order, and so on for all other pin numbers present. We'll see once I take them both apart.

    Yep that'd also work for me in case of any problems with the approach above although I've seen warnings that the key can be taken out in the ON position that way, leading to surprises like flat battery (they also mentioned ECU and immo going out of sync as a result but I'm unsure about it as my car was once left with a fully flat battery for at least a week and nothing bad happened).

    In fact a few videos at Youtube suggest it may not be that bad as typically the pins remain stuck because of the old grease/dust mix and don't even jump out, e.g. starting 5:11 into this one:


    Still I'll be extremely careful when doing mine. In some other video they explain how to "decode" it, i.e. write down sequential pin numbers in two lines (A and B), which I suppose is some standard approach used by the pros.
     
  13. sweex Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    That looks somewhat more sturdy than the lock that jammed in the 90's PUG that I had, and you're right about the key not staying in at engine running position with pins removed. But if there's an issue with one or more sets of pins in the original lock, just leave that set out, the remaining sets should be enough ?
     
  14. dandreye Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom London
    8
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    Sounds good: they'll keep the key in place.